Harold Pollack

Harold Pollack is Helen Ross Professor of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago.

Recent Articles

FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES IN THE STIMULUS PACKAGE

by Harold Pollack The current stimulus package includes some funds for family planning services provided to Medicaid recipients. Republicans are predictably upset, and the Obama administration may decide to pull this provision. Lindsey Beyerstein has a nice little article over at the Washington Independent recounting the dispute. Family planning is no pork barrel item. By any reasonable public health measure, these services are more important and cost-effective than many other health expenditures nobody is fighting about. Contraception is central to maternal and child health. Proper birth spacing and preconceptional planning are especially key for low-income Medicaid recipients. Preventing unintended pregnancies seems like a pretty good thing, too. One more thing: Contraception is a nontrivial expense for many women. Better Medicaid coverage for these services provides a timely implicit tax cut for needy women. I appreciate the delicacy of the Administration's political calculations...

ATTACKING OUR WORST DRUG PROBLEM

by Harold Pollack And he drank of the wine, and was drunken, and he was uncovered within his tent. Ham saw the nakedness of his father, and told his two brethren who were without. And Shem and Japeth took a garment, and laid it out upon both their shoulders, and went backward, covered the nakedness of their father, and their faces were backward, and they saw not their father's nakedness. Noah was not the first person to go astray due to his alcohol use. He certainly wasn't the last. For millennia, problem drinking had harmed many drinkers, their families, and the wider community. For sure, tobacco kills more people, but by any other measure, alcohol poses far-and-away America’s most serious drug problem. A University of Washington team estimated that harmful drinking caused almost 64,000 deaths in the year 2000....

PROGRESSILLINOIS ON OVERCROWDED JAILS

by Harold Pollack If you are serious about Illinois public policy, progressillinois is an essential source. Hat's-off to Josh Kalven for today's story on overcrowding at Cook County Jail. While we are at it, hat's-off to Alderwoman Toni Preckwinkle for raising this issue on television this morning. It's heartening that local elected politicians are willing to tackle this subject, and that they are willing to step up on behalf of a despised group of citizens who need help. Prisons and jails should be great assets to American public health. After all, we have a uniquely high-risk population literally under lock-and-key, in a setting where we might address a wide variety of public health concerns ranging from infectious disease transmission to psychiatric disorders and substance abuse. Instead, a toxic combination of overcrowding, serious management challenges, and lack of resources conspires to make bad public health problems even worse. President Obama would be wise to place...

GHOST WRITING AND OTHER CAMPAIGN WAR STORIES

By Harold Pollack It’s a pleasure to guest again. I am a public health researcher at the University of Chicago's School of Social Service Administration, where I am faculty chair of the Center for Health Administration Studies. The Obama team has been rightly tight-lipped about the internal mechanics of its campaign victory. I hope the big shorts forgive me one war story. I say “war story,” advisedly; imagine Studs Terkel covering the Normandy invasion by interviewing the guy in the back room distributing candy bars and post-it notes. I like this story because it involves me, but also because it provides one window into how healthcare became central to the campaign. I performed odd jobs in the spring, summer, and fall. Professor Paula Lantz and I co-chaired a volunteer advisory public health group that assisted the Obama campaign. April 15, we got a hush-hush email asking to help with something. I figured they wanted a 45-minute sit-down with the Candidate so I could broker a...

Lessons From the ER

Navigating a family health emergency, one policy expert learns it's not just doctors who make mistakes--systems can make them worse.

I held my wife Veronica's hand as the technician applied cool gel to her chest. At first, the ultrasound images were the fuzzy black-and-whites I remembered from before our daughters Rebecca and Hannah were born. After a few touches to the LCD screen, a breathtaking three-dimensional movie began to run. It featured Veronica's heart, its thick walls beating yellow against a black background. The technician maneuvered a trackball to reveal the various parts undulating in unison. Colored regions displayed blood velocity and turbulence through the different chambers. Suspended in virtual space, Veronica's heart looked every millimeter the impregnable pump I had always assumed it was. Veronica is 46, does four hard workouts every week on the stepping machine, eats sensibly, and has a resting pulse of 60. So when she woke me at 2 A.M. and calmly reported funny chest pains radiating to her shoulder blades and down her arms, the obvious came to mind, but it was hard to really believe...

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