J. Goodrich

J. Goodrich is a recovering economist and the sole proprietor of the political blog Echidne of the Snakes. She also blogs for TAPPED.

Recent Articles

RETURN ON SUCCESS.

RETURN ON SUCCESS. One is never too old to learn new terms, it seems. Before president Bush's latest speech I had never heard about "return on success." It sounds a little like ROI, or "return on investment", a way to figure out the financial profitability of some business project. But "success" is not the same thing as "investment." Indeed, "success" is left fairly undefined in the context Bush used it -- in place of where he might have used "victory" in the past.

COMITY AND CUCUMBER SANDWICHES.

COMITY AND CUCUMBER SANDWICHES. Given the recent furor over the MoveOn ad using the term BetrayUs and also the instantaneous reaction to John Kerry's troop joke last fall it is interesting to watch whether Democrats will make any kind of hay over Boehner's "small price" comment. Sure, he may not have meant the troop deaths when he used the term "small price." But similar clarifications concerning Kerry's joke or the BetrayUs one haven't gotten much traction in the media.

AND EVEN MORE ON CONSERVATIVE COLUMNISTS.

AND EVEN MORE ON CONSERVATIVE COLUMNISTS. Kate and Ezra have already referred to the Media Matters study findings on TAPPED. Those findings suggest that if you want to be an op-ed columnist in politics you'd better be very conservative. That's the way to maximize your market appeal.

GOING ALL BIPARTISAN.

GOING ALL BIPARTISAN. I've read much recently about the desirability for more comity and bipartisanship in Congress and also much about the impossibility of reaching across the aisle given the dearth of topics on which the two sides agree. Two topics suggest themselves to true bipartisan action.

One is the question of limiting the enhanced presidential powers. Charlie Savage notes:

THE POLITICAL BRAIN.

THE POLITICAL BRAIN. The LA Times reports on a study which compared the way the brains of supposed liberals and conservatives work:

Exploring the neurobiology of politics, scientists have found that liberals tolerate ambiguity and conflict better than conservatives because of how their brains work.

Scientists at New York University and UCLA showed through a simple experiment to be reported Monday in the journal Nature Neuroscience that political orientation is related to differences in how the brain processes information.

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