Jaime Fuller

Jaime Fuller is a former associate editor at The American Prospect

Recent Articles

Immigration Catch-22

Yesterday, a bipartisan group of eight senators unveiled a comprehensive immigration-reform plan. Today, Barack Obama gave a speech outlining a very similar plan, causing the four Republicans in that group to disavow their own plan as a socialist plot whose only plausible purpose is to bring a tsunami of radical Kenyan immigrants to our shores so they can marry our women and produce future presidents who will further weaken this great nation. OK, so that's not really what happened. But given recent experience, it wouldn't have been all that surprising if it had. Now that Barack Obama has joined the immigration debate with his own plan (like the bipartisan one, at this point it's not particularly detailed), it will take all the fortitude Republicans can muster to keep from doing a 180, just as they did on the individual health-insurance mandate and cap and trade, once those ideas were infected by contact with Obama. They know that their political future may depend on not screwing up...

The Only Thing to Fear is Never Getting Elected Again

Ah, bipartisanship. Can you smell it? Well it's in the air again, as a group of eight senators (for the love of god, can we not call them a "gang"?), four Democrats and four Republicans, unveiled a proposal for immigration reform. It includes a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants (an even faster one for seasonal agricultural workers, because what, do you expect native-born Americans to spend 10 hours a day bending over in the hot sun?), measures to improve the legal immigration system, and efforts to attract skilled immigrants. The proposal also stipulates that the path to citizenship would only happen after the implementation of stricter border enforcement, but one of the great unacknowledged developments of recent years is that border enforcement is far more vigorous than it used to be. We've got more Border Patrol agents making more arrests, and Barack Obama has deported people much faster than George W. Bush did (there were more than 400,000 deportations in 2012, a new...

You Snooze, You Lose

For all the successes of his first term, Barack Obama had a number of notable failures, some of which got more attention than others. One of the less-noticed is the fact that Obama has been slow to fill vacancies on the federal courts. Granted, Republicans in the Senate have resisted the appointments he has made, but in many cases, Obama has barely tried. For instance, right now there are three vacancies on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, which handles lots of important issues involving the working of the federal government and the separation of powers. Today, Obama is probably wishing he had been more aggressive about filling those seats. A three-judge panel of the D.C. Circuit—Republican appointees all—ruled that the president has no power to make recess appointments when Congress is in a recess, but can only do so during the recess that happens but once a year between congressional sessions. And yes, they expounded in some detail about the critical difference between "a" and "...

Why People Hate D.C.: Exhibit A, B, and C

Yesterday, a bunch of silly Republicans pretended to be mad at Hillary Clinton, then got genuinely mad when she replied to them sharply. Today some of the same Republicans pretended to be mad in the general direction of John Kerry, who was testifying in support of his nomination to be secretary of state. Tempers stayed in check for the most part, though, and despite their distress at the fact that Kerry is likely to support the policies of the president who appointed him, Republicans will let Kerry slide through without too much of a fight. Meanwhile, Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell reached a deal on filibuster reform, agreeing that actually reforming the filibuster in any meaningful way would be a bad idea (more details below). So we can look forward to another Congress in which every piece of legislation more momentous than declaring August to be National Snap Pea Awareness Month will require a supermajority of 60 votes in order to pass. Not that much of anything would pass the House...

To Run or Not to Run, That Is the Question

If the latest poll from ABC News and The Washington Post is any indication, Hillary Clinton is one of the most popular political figures in the country. Sixty-seven percent of Americans have a positive view of the Secretary of State, former senator, and former first lady. Twenty-six percent hold a negative opinion, and only six percent say they have no thoughts on Clinton. All of which means, to many pundits, that she'd have a cakewalk into the White House in 2016. Before we begin a second premature coronation for the potential presidential candidate, however, it’s worth noting that Clinton's popularity is a partial function of her remove from partisan politics. She wasn’t at all involved in the presidential campaign, and while she belongs to a Democratic administration, she's spent the last four years representing the interests of the nation writ large. But as we saw this afternoon with the testimony over last year’s incident in Benghazi, where American diplomats were killed after...

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