Jaime Fuller

Jaime Fuller is a former associate editor at The American Prospect

Recent Articles

Daily Meme: Your One-Stop Guide to Ruining Thanksgiving

Turkey and politics, served on the rocks of fractious family dinner conversation, is a volatile cocktail best left unserved over the holidays. Most D.C. columnists don't seem to have gotten the memo, seeing as they've bombarded us with unsightly heaps of Thanksgiving metaphors. In discussing the Hobby Lobby contraception-mandate case, Michelle Malkin writes , "Religious liberty is front and center on the nation’s Thanksgiving table." Vanity Fair is " thankful for the names Anthony Weiner and Sydney Leathers (we feel like it isn’t remarked upon enough that those are their actual names)." A blogger at HuffPo laments the war on Thanksgiving : "The profiteers see this Thanksgiving as their D-Day. D-Day on Turkey Day. This is their Normandy. They have finally made landfall and have started to swing the momentum of the battle." If you want to raise warring on Thanksgiving to an art, however, you can't get much better than this Charles Beard piece from 1920. Even the White House seems intent...

Daily Meme: The Turkey Has Landed

The White House is expecting a very important guest tomorrow. Said guest is adored by the children of the nation, loves Beyoncé, is obsessive about exercise, and a total ham in front of the press . He also tastes delicious with cranberry sauce. Yes, we're talking about the national turkey. The White House has gotten really into it this year. Caramel and Popcorn —formerly known as Viking and Gunnar, were the turkey finalists handpicked from a farm in Minnesota, the top producer of turkeys in the country. Gobblynob, Butterfluff, Ole, and Sven were the unfortunate also-rans who won't be getting a pardon. It's a pretty clutch gig if you can get it. It comes with an all-expenses paid trip to D.C., a free stay at a fancy hotel , and a chance to spend the rest of your life at Disney World or another retirement home for elderly poultry. Although, ominously, turkeys also never seem to last very long after they visit the White House. "Is Obama casting death spells on these poor birds?" Nope,...

Daily Meme: The West's Nuclear Options

Over the weekend, we finally worked out a nuclear deal with Iran. Here's the plan. And if you'd rather not waste time reading the agreement, here's a pretty chart from The New York Times that breaks it all down. If you'd rather dive even deeper into the process, Reuters has a good tick-tock of the negotiations. Why is the deal merely a six-month deal, rather than a permenant arrangement? Let Obama's former arms-control coordinator explain: "The reason for an interim deal rather than a permanent agreement is because Iran is not willing to accept the limits on its nuclear program demanded by the P5-plus-1 as a condition for permanently lifting nuclear-related sanctions. In particular, the U.S. wants Iran to accept physical limits on the scope and scale of its enrichment program so that Iran cannot produce significant quantities of highly enriched (weapons grade) uranium quickly and to halt construction of the heavy-water research reactor or replace it with a type that would produce less...

Daily Meme: A Trip Down Memory Lane with the Nuclear Option

"To prevent Democrats from blocking President Bush's judicial nominees, Senate Republicans are considering a parliamentary maneuver with potentially explosive consequences called ''the nuclear option.'" "The Republicans see the filibuster as an annoying obstacle. " Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist : "One way or another, the filibuster of judicial nominees must end. The Senate must do what is good, what is right, what is reasonable and what is honorable." Senator Harry Reid : "I think they would be making a huge mistake to try to mess with the rules." Jonah Goldberg : "Whoever it was on the Republican side who coined the term 'nuclear option,' you should forever be banned from coining clever phrases. This has always struck me as an idiotic phrase on every level. First, it concedes that changing the rules would be radical and dangerous, which plays perfectly into the Democrats’ hands. Second, it’s factually untrue. Changing the rules wouldn’t have blown up the Senate." Vice President...

Cliffnotes for the Chattering Class: The JFK Assassination

AP Photo
AP Photo ​In 1965, there was already a glut of Kennedy books being published by the many assembled observers of JFK's death. The only qualification necessary to write a book on the presidential assassination on November 22, 1963, was a healthy ego; decades later, merely having a pulse when Lee Harvey Oswald's bullet struck warrants a healthy advance. Historian James MacGregor Burns reviewed two of the big ones, both by people who were truly qualified to comment on Camelot—Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Kennedy's court historian, and Ted Sorenson, the slain president's speechwriter. His 1965 review of Schlesinger's A Thousand Days starts, More than any other people, perhaps, Americans like to leave issues to the "verdict of history." When some problem seems too opaque or some leader too inscrutable, we comfort ourselves with the thought that some day the historians will decide the merits of the case or take the final measure of the man. The trouble is that historians never come in with a...

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