Jamelle Bouie

Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

Better Hacks, Please.

The Heritage Foundation needs a better class of propagandist, since this is embarrassing : At home, liberal intellectuals lauded the economic accomplishments of the Soviet Union. Reagan was not so easily seduced. In late 1981 and all of 1982, when his tax cuts had not yet kicked in and the U.S. economy still lagged, President Reagan reassured his worried aides and counseled them to stay the course. He had faith in the American people who, if they could be “liberated from the restraints imposed on them by government,” would pull “the country out of its tailspin.” Reagan told the British Parliament that a “global campaign for freedom” would prevail over the forces of tyranny and that “the Soviet Union itself is not immune to this reality.” By the end of the decade, as he predicted, Marxism-Leninism was dumped on the ash heap of history. America, though, experienced the longest peacetime economic expansion in U.S. history, with 17 million new jobs created during the Reagan years. This is...

Give Me Liberty, Or Give Me Incineration.

The Onion offers a pitch-perfect parody of the current political moment: In a strong rebuke of President Obama and his domestic agenda, all 242 House Republicans voted Wednesday to repeal the Asteroid Destruction and American Preservation Act, which was signed into law last year to destroy the immense asteroid currently hurtling toward Earth. [...] "This law is a job killer," said Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-NC), who argued the tax increases required to save the human species from annihilation would impose unbearably high costs on businesses. "If we sit back and do nothing, Obamastroid will result in hundreds of thousands of lost jobs, which we simply can't afford in this economy." "And consider how much money this program will add to our already bloated deficit," Foxx continued. "Is this the legacy we want to leave our children?" And of course, even fake Barack Obama is a little too sensible: "While I recognize that intelligent minds may disagree on this issue, I believe we have an...

The Democratic Party Heads South.

To repeat: Presidential convention placement doesn't matter as far as eventual vote outcome is concerned. But it is noteworthy that Democrats are optimistic about their chances in North Carolina: The selection of North Carolina also underscored the hope of Mr. Obama and his advisers that they have a better chance of organizing supporters — and finding new voters — in a conservative-leaning but demographically evolving Southern state than in a traditional battleground like Missouri. The advisers believe the advantages of North Carolina include a population that is 22 percent black, an influx of new residents because of research and banking jobs, and laws that allow last-minute voter registration. North Carolina looks good, I suppose, but the rest of the South is largely off-limits to Democrats. After last year's serious losses, only 36 House Democrats hail from the states of the former Confederacy, and of those, only 16 are white. Virginia, which sent six Democrats to the House in the...

More Judges, But Little Balance.

Senate Democrats plan to test the informal arrangement to filibuster less and speed up the confirmation process with "noncontroversial" judicial nominations: The Senate Judiciary Committee is poised to send at least eleven nominations to the floor, likely this Thursday. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), meanwhile, has expressed his desire to hold a vote on one or a few of those nominees before the caucus leaves for its upcoming retreat. "We should expect to see anywhere from one to a handful of votes on judicial nominees end of the week or early next week," a Senate Democratic leadership aide said. The idea, explained the aide, is to test whether an informal agreement between Republicans and Democrats to either filibuster less or expedite the confirmation process has had any tangible impact. The nominees being re-considered by the Judiciary Committee were categorized as non-controversial holdovers from the last Senate session. Democratic lawmakers want to clear those...

Different Jobs, Different Skills.

Via Salon 's Andrew Leonard , I wish this were said more often than it is: Alas, governing the United States is a task fundamentally different from running either a small business or a Fortune 500 company. You could even argue that the qualities that make for a good CEO -- at least insofar as judged by American standards of capitalist success -- are manifestly useless when applied to the job of steering the federal government. [...] In corporate America, you follow orders or you get fired. There is no such thing as a filibuster, or a secret hold that prevents the CEO from appointing his or her own pick to a crucial position. Perhaps the single most frustrating thing that any business leader will discover very quickly after moving into the Oval Office is that on the most important issues, your power to make your will manifest is extremely limited. I go a little insane whenever a corporate leader promises to bring "business sense" to Washington (or the statehouse, for that matter). As...

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