Jamelle Bouie

Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

Nope, Nothing to See Here.

You can't disagree with this (from Matt Yglesias ): In other words, there’s no debate in Washington about whether rich people should get a permanent tax cut. Nor is there any debate in Washington about whether rich people’s tax cut should be financed by long-term borrowing. Nor is there any debate about whether rich people should get a bigger tax cut than middle class people. But we “can’t afford” unemployment insurance, we “can’t afford” to pay bank regulators competitive salaries. On a related note, I thought this was an amusing line from The New York Times ' look at Russian corruption, as revealed in the leaked diplomatic cables: The cables also showed how bureaucratic, national and economic power often all converged in the Kremlin, and how the state’s suitors grasped that access often equaled results. [...] The cables further revealed how the nexus of business and state interests among Russia’s ruling elite had fueled suspicions in Washington that Mr. Putin, in spite of his...

When I Lose, You Lose, Just Like That.

In all likelihood, The Wall Street Journal reports , Democrats will cave and extend the Bush tax cuts in full: Separate from the formal negotiations, congressional aides from both parties have begun discussing a temporary extension of the expiring tax cuts. ... They have considered short-term extensions of a number of business and individual tax provisions that are expired or expiring, such as a popular research credit and middle-class protection from the alternative minimum tax. A likely outcome includes a one- to three-year extension of the Bush-era income tax rates and a two-year extension of the business provisions, according to aides. The package could include Democratic priorities such as extension of tax breaks that benefit the working poor, as well as further extension of unemployment benefits for the long-term jobless. If Democrats and Republicans manage a "compromise," I really doubt that it would involve extension of unemployment benefits. At this point, Republicans have...

The Next Campaign-Finance Battle

Progressives have good reason to worry about an Arizona campaign-finance case coming before the Supreme Court.

The Roberts Court is poised to remake campaign-finance law -- again. Progressives angry about the flood of corporate money into this year's midterm elections already know they can thank the Court for its willingness to gut a century of campaign law with its Citizens United decision. The Court also wasn't friendly to campaign-finance reform when it struck down substantial portions of Vermont's public-financing law in 2006. Now, progressives and campaign-reform advocates are wary of what the Court will do in a new case involving Arizona's public-financing law. As Tara Malloy of the Campaign Legal Center, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that works on campaign finance and elections, says ruefully, "We should be on guard for when the Roberts Court takes on campaign financing." To be fair, there's no guarantee that McComish v. Bennett has to turn into a repeat of Citizens United . For starters, the focus is incredibly narrow. McComish deals with an aspect of Arizona's public-financing...

Listening to the Guy You Worship.

Blake Gopnik on the National Portrait Gallery's decision to close an exhibit after pressure from members of the religious right: Tuesday, after a few hours of pressure from the Catholic League and various conservatives, it decided to remove a video by David Wojnarowicz, a gay artist who died from AIDS-related illness in 1992. As part of "Hide/Seek," the gallery was showing a four-minute excerpt from a 1987 piece titled "A Fire in My Belly," made in honor of Peter Hujar, an artist-colleague and lover of Wojnarowicz who had died of AIDS complications in 1987. And for 11 seconds of that meandering, stream-of-consciousness work (the full version is 30 minutes long) a crucifix appears onscreen with ants crawling on it. It seems such an inconsequential part of the total video that neither I nor anyone I've spoken to who saw the work remembered it at all. But that is the portion of the video that the Catholic League has decried as "designed to insult and inflict injury and assault the...

Democrats Have a Problem With Diversity? Americans Have a Problem With Racism.

It actually took me two reads and a conversation with a colleague to understand this odd column by National Journal 's Josh Kraushaar . First, Kraushaar declares that Democrats have a "diversity problem." Why? Because for all their minority representatives -- 75 black, Hispanic, and Asian-American Democrats in Congress and governorships -- Democrats still have a problem with electing non-white candidates in majority-white constituencies: Of the 75 black, Hispanic, and Asian-American Democrats in Congress and governorships, only nine represent majority-white constituencies—and that declines to six in 2011. Two of the party’s rising black stars who sought statewide office this year were rejected by their party’s own base. And when you only look at members of Congress or governors elected by majority-white constituencies (in other words, most of the governorships and Senate seats, and 337 out of 435 House seats), Democrats trail Republicans in minority representation. [...] The numbers...

Pages