Jamelle Bouie

Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

Whitewater: Part Deux.

Rep. Darrell Issa , the incoming chair of the Government Oversight Committee, is clearly giddy at the thought of turning the 112th Congress into a '90s-esque circus of bogus investigations: California Rep. Darrell Issa is already eyeing a massive expansion of oversight for next year, including hundreds of hearings; creating new subcommittees; and launching fresh investigations into the bank bailout, the stimulus and, potentially, health care reform. Issa told POLITICO in an interview that he wants each of his seven subcommittees to hold “one or two hearings each week.” “I want seven hearings a week, times 40 weeks,” Issa said. Issa was decidedly more understated than this before the elections, but that probably has more to do with the political optics of planning endless investigations, than it does with any sense of limits on what is necessary or acceptable. In any case, officials in the Obama White House should prepare for a repeat of the mid-1990s, when the Oversight Committee, led...

What Goes Around ...

Laura Clawson has a fantastic post up at Daily Kos about the Democrats who lost in last week's elections but who still have a bright future in Democratic politics. Joe Sestak , in particular, strikes me as someone who still has legs: Whether he wants his old seat back, wants to be Governor, or wants to take another shot at the U.S. Senate, Joe Sestak would likely make a very strong candidate in an open year. Though his campaigns have seldom fit the establishment profile, he has routinely outperformed expectations -- including first in the primary against Arlen Specter and then the extremely close general election this year. Given his strong performance in Delaware County in 2010, his old seat in PA-07 (now held by Republican Pat Meehan) is probably his if he wants it back. Two things: As Clawson argues well, election losses don't always end the story, and there are many successful politicians -- including the president of the United States -- who came back from electoral failure to...

Shock and Awe.

Maybe I'm wrong to laugh at naked prejudice, but I found this Washington Times op-ed to be completely hilarious: The Hawkeye State's judicial elections rarely generate much controversy or interest, with most judges generally enjoying approval levels of around 75 percent. That changed with the high court's unanimous 2009 decision discovering a right to homosexual "marriage" in the state constitution—a view that would have shocked those who drafted the document long before homosexuality was the subject of polite conversation, let alone political debate. So, the real question is what other views would have shocked those who drafted the Iowa Constitution. Given that the document was written in 1857, I think there are a few obvious candidates: planes, cars, televisions, computers, Barack Obama , free black people, free black people writing on computers, women in pants, the Monster Thickburger . All of these things would have offended (or terrified!) those who wrote the Iowa Constitution,...

Old Wars for Young Kids.

This is something I've thought about more than once: Lance Cpl. Jacob Adams was in 5th grade math class when hijacked jetliners slammed into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. His parents took him out of school early that day. Adams, 20, is now serving in a Marine battalion battling Taliban gunmen, many of whom were also just kids on Sept. 11, 2001. He's part of a new generation of U.S. troops inheriting the wars spawned by the terror attacks. Many of the men and women who took part in the initial invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq have since left the military and moved on with their lives. The changing of the guard is a graphic and personal reminder that the fighting has dragged on longer than anyone ever imagined. I was a freshman in high school when the towers fell -- we watched the CNN broadcast from biology class -- and of the 500 people who graduated with me in 2005, more than a handful are in the military, and quite a few of those have served in Iraq or Afghanistan. One of...

The Limits of Presidential Rhetoric.

(Flickr/ The U.S. Army ) At Grist, Joe Romm rips into President Obama Obama hasn't merely failed to get a climate bill. Given the self-described (and self-inflicted) "shellacking" the president received Tuesday, he has made it all but impossible for a return to such an alignment of the stars this decade. Indeed, he has, arguably, poisoned the well for the next president, not merely because of the "shellacking," but also by his failure to use his bully pulpit to be an unabashed defender of climate and clean energy action. Team Obama helped create the broad-based misperception that those issues are political losers, in spite of every poll to the contrary, in spite of the fact that in the one place where a broad coalition combined with political leaders who were genuine climate hawks, Californians won the clean energy and climate trifecta, including a stunning 20-point win preserving their landmark cap-and-trade climate bill. Of course, "get a climate bill" is shorthand for "move a...

Pages