Jamelle Bouie

Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

Giving Blue Dogs the Pink Slip.

Ari Berman wants fewer Blue Dogs in the Democratic coalition: [...] Democrats would be in better shape, and would accomplish more, with a smaller and more ideologically cohesive caucus. It’s a sentiment that even Mr. Dean now echoes. “Having a big, open-tent Democratic Party is great, but not at the cost of getting nothing done,” he said. Since the passage of health care reform, few major bills have passed the Senate. Although the Democrats have a 59-vote majority, party leaders can barely find the votes for something as benign as extending unemployment benefits. A smaller majority, minus the intraparty feuding, could benefit Democrats in two ways: first, it could enable them to devise cleaner pieces of legislation, without blatantly trading pork for votes as they did with the deals that helped sour the public on the health care bill. This strikes me as a classic case of "the grass is greener." After a year of being frustrated by the likes of Bart Stupak and Ben Nelson , it makes...

It's Not Over Till It's Over.

Daniel Larison is still bearish on the odds that Republicans will win a majority in November: At this point, it appears that Republicans will gain 35 seats. If all of the toss-ups broke for the Republicans, they could realistically gain 41, which would be just enough, but all of them are not going to break their way. [...] The least certain pick-ups are AR-01, ND-AL, OH-18, MI-07, NH-02, NV-03, and SC-05, but I am still assuming Republicans win these. Democratic pick-ups will include the three everyone expects in LA-02, DE-AL and IL-10, and will most likely include Hawaii’s First District and Florida’s 25th. If that’s right and Republicans come up five seats short of a majority, all this talk of “miraculous comebacks” will seem rather silly. Obviously, people pushing the “1994-but-bigger” argument will have some explaining to do. Gaining 35 seats in the House is impressive, and it will be the second-largest turnover in my lifetime, but after the overhyping of Republican chances for...

Unhealthy Food Is Cheap Food.

(Blaustein/ The Value of a Dollar ) How much food can you buy for one dollar? With the help of his camera, Jonathan Blaustein traveled New Mexico to find out : It was a cheeseburger that initially encouraged Mr. Blaustein, 36, to pursue his project, “The Value of a Dollar.” When the economy was in the midst of its downward spiral, he visited a fast-food chain in New Mexico, where he lives. “On one menu they had a cheeseburger for a dollar,” he said. What caught his eye, though, was another menu, which featured a double cheeseburger for the same price. That additional piece of meat, and the extra slice of cheese, somehow didn’t change the price. So he set out to see what he could buy for one dollar in New Mexico. Then he turned the techniques used in advertising on their head, showcasing food in its most realistic form. In public conversations about obesity and health, we wonder why people, especially the poor, don't buy healthier food. But the explanation isn't that complicated; a...

The Demographic Gap.

Republicans should heed David Frum 's point about generalizing from November's elections: Be very careful about projecting forward from the 2010 congressional results to the 2012 presidential vote. These elections almost occur in two different countries. Be very careful about assuming that Republican success in 2010 signifies that Republicans have overcome the longer-term problems that I’ve been writing about these past five years. If Republicans cannot connect better to the huge new Millennial generation, next month’s success will only be a happy interval before 2012’s grim challenges. Frum is right; the electorate that will give the GOP a 10- to 20-vote majority in 2010 is vastly different from the electorate that will vote for president in 2012. In two years, the average voter will be a little younger, a little browner, and a little less likely to support the GOP, which will almost certainly translate to a slightly greater willingness to vote for Democratic candidates for the House...

Steve Jobs: Probably Not Big Brother.

Last week, as part of its "Back to the Mac" presentation, Apple announced that it would be opening an "App Store" for the next iteration of OS X, Lion. Like the iPhone and iPad App Stores, this one would give users the choice of quickly installing programs from a central, Apple-controlled database. The catch, for iOS users, is that they can only install applications from within the App Store. Neither the iPhone nor the iPad supports "outside" apps, which can only be accessed through "jailbreaking," or opening up the device to non-certified programs. By contrast, the Mac App Store is designed to be a compliment to the traditional method of downloading applications from the Internet or installing them from an optical drive. Someone should tell this last fact to Gizmodo's Matt Buchanan , who is too busy emoting about Steve Jobs ' impending tyranny to see that he's wrong : More than 25 years ago, a commercial warned us about the future of computers. Closed. Censored. Dark. A "garden of...

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