Jeff Faux

Jeff Faux is a distinguished fellow at the Economic Policy Institute, which he founded. His latest book, The Servant Economy (Wiley), was published in June 2012.

Recent Articles

Solidarity Ever?

Works Discussed in this Essay Stanley Aronowitz From the Ashes of the Old: American Labor and America's Future (Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998). Morton Bahr From the Telegraph to the Internet (National Press Books, 1998). Century Foundation Task Force Report on the Future of the American Labor Movement, 1999. John Sweeney was elected president of the AFL-CIO in October 1995. Frustrated by labor's shrinking share of the workforce, and shocked by the Democratic Party's loss of the House of Representatives the previous November, Sweeney and his allies staged the only successful revolt against a sitting labor federation president in this century. Given organized labor's historic role in supporting the liberal advances of the New Deal and Great Society, progressive precincts of American politics cheered the prospect of a reenergized AFL-CIO. During the first few months of the new regime, Sweeney and his team criss-crossed union halls all over the country preaching a gospel of aggressive...

Three Things We Learned

There is no silver lining to the cloud of horror that descended on America last week. And the avalanche of pain, terror, and death we have witnessed may be just the beginning. But life, as always, slowly picks up and moves on. Despite the nagging sense that it is unseemly to begin thinking about the economic consequences, the country is once again back in the market. Investors are selling the stocks of insurance companies and airlines, buying those of military contractors and companies that will benefit from the new security-conscious society. Economists are calculating the gains and losses and guessing about the odds of a recession. Many are engaged in burying the dead and tending to the survivors, or facing the awesome responsibility of satisfying the national demand for action that serves justice rather than multiplying evil. Those of us who are going back to business have an obligation, as we do, to reflect on what we have seen. The attacks of last Tuesday revealed some truths...

The North American Way

T here is no silver lining to the cloud of horror that descended on America September 11. Many are engaged in burying the dead and tending to the survivors or facing the awesome responsibility of satisfying the national demand for action that serves justice rather than multiplying evil. Those of us who are going back to "business as usual" have an obligation, as we do so, to reflect on what we have seen. The September 11 attacks revealed some truths about the American political economy that have been obscured in recent years. One is just how much of our economy is made up of what used to be called the "working class"--the nonsupervisory, non-college-educated people who make up 70 percent of our labor force. For the last half-dozen years, the media saw economic trends through the eyes of the glamorous, globe-trotting business executive--to the point that many people abroad must think the corporate elite represent the vast majority of American workers. And one could hardly find a more...

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