Jennie Williams

Jennie Williams is a Prospect fall 2012 intern. 

Recent Articles

Will Massachusetts Voters Legalize Assisted Suicide?

This is the ninth in the Prospect's series on the 174 measures on state ballots this year.

Six years ago, Mesfin Nega was attacked outside a nightclub. He suffered a broken neck and a damaged spinal cord that transformed the previously healthy 32-year-old into a quadriplegic. As The Washington Post later reported, Nega had made a pact with his friend Shimelis Yegazu: If one were ever to suffer an injury that required him to be connected to life-sustaining equipment, the other would take it upon himself to disconnect the equipment. Nega and Yegazu made the news last week when Yegazu followed through with this pact, administering a lethal dose of phenobarbital to Nega, and then taking a fatal dose himself.

Manhattan, Shaken and Stirred

Hurricane Sandy devastated much of the East Coast—especially New York City and New Jersey—last night. Here's a collection of photos documenting much of the damage.

AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews

New York City is still assessing the extent of the damage wrought by Hurricane Sandy. Over 660,000 people lost electricity—a quarter of a million customers in Manhattan alone. Schools, the stock exchange, and the subway system all shut down as businesses closed their doors and people sought shelter. Here’s a slideshow of images from the storm and its aftermath.

The Freedom Tour

Aung San Suu Kyi speaks at Amnesty International on her first visit to the United States after 19 years of house arrest.

(AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

The hour before Aung San Suu Kyi’s arrival at a human rights town hall hosted by Amnesty International Thursday wasn’t quiet. The audience chanted (“What do we want? Human rights!”). A biographic video was played. Magazines with Suu Kyi’s face on the cover were distributed. Like pre-match hype, the build up was big.

Myanmar's pro-democracy leader is not—the slight 65 year-old, with pink flowers pinned in her hair, finally appeared shortly before noon. At times, it was a strain to hear her speak, and the microphone twice switched off. But Aung San Suu Kyi is the giant of the Burmese struggle for human rights. She’s in the United States, her first visit since being released from 19 years of house arrest in 2010, for a 17-day tour.