Joshua Green

Joshua Green is an editor at The Washington Monthly and a former staff writer at
The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

Hot Air:

So there you are, a pollutant-spewing refinery, nimbly dodging Environmental Protection Agency regulators as you deliver record earnings to shareholders. Along with your comrades, you've donated $25.5 million to Republicans in the 2000 election cycle. Things are going smoothly. Your man Bush is in the White House, he's drummed up an "energy crisis" that he says requires him to go easy on you; maybe he's even given you a nickname. Then, all of a sudden, you hear that four energy companies have just settled clean air lawsuits -- on terms favorable to the government ! What's more, Attorney General John Ashcroft suddenly sounds like he's been possessed by Ralph Nader: "Enforcing environmental law is a top priority for the Justice Department," Ashcroft says, to your amazement. "I look forward to protecting our natural resources and helping ensure that companies are in compliance with the law." If he means what he says, you're in big trouble. Do you: A) Get Dick Cheney on the phone and give...

Amnesty for the GOP:

Earlier this week, the Bush administration's immigration taskforce leaked word that it was considering a proposal to grant amnesty to the estimated 3 million Mexicans living illegally in the United States. The amnesty plan is one of many proposals under consideration by the taskforce. But just leaking the fact that it was being considered guaranteed prominent coverage and much positive speculation. Immigration experts believe that such a measure could be a political windfall for Bush, who received only 35 percent of the Hispanic vote in last year's election. As Frank Sharry, executive director of the immigration rights advocacy group National Immigration Forum told the Washington Post : "If George W. Bush plays this right, he can achieve an enormous victory both in terms of sensible immigration policy and in repositioning the Republican Party on an issue that has hurt the party badly in recent years." Declaring amnesty would give Bush the added benefit of pleasing many businesses that...

Tom Delay's Empty suit

"House Democrats yesterday filed suit against Majority Whip Tom DeLay (R-Tex.) accusing him of extortion and money laundering. The civil suit alleges the whip pressured contributors into donating to the GOP and then directed those funds to nonprofit political groups that do not disclose their donors or how they are spending the money." The Washington Post , May 4, 2000 House Democrats yesterday filed suit against Majority Whip Tom DeLay, accusing him of stalking and intent to maim. An accompanying request for a restraining order revealed that the complainant, Janet Reno, asked that DeLay be kept at least 50 yards from her at all times, and at least 100 yards from any television camera. An emergency amicus brief contesting the request was filed on behalf of DeLay by producers of NBC's Meet the Press . The Washington Post , June 4, 2000 House Democrats yesterday filed suit against Republican leaders in Congress for abandoning a vehicle, specifically the 1994 Contract with America. The...

Numbers Racket:

One frequently cited reason for the Democrats' uninspired response to George W. Bush's $1.6 trillion tax cut plan is that they're no longer privy to the White House's staff of number crunchers. There once was a time, under President Clinton, when these tax wizards worked on behalf of Democrats. They'd run the numbers for the latest Republican tax scheme and discover that, say, Dick Armey's proposal to abolish the tax on Lear Jets primarily benefited the rich. Armed with facts and figures like these, Democrats could keep most Republican excesses in check. But with Bush in the White House, that's no longer an option. Democrats can still complain about the unfairness of Bush's cut, but they can't throw around the kind of numbers they once could to demonstrate why it's a lousy idea. Fortunately, I can. Like most working Americans, I recently received my W-2 form in the mail. And like most, I flinched when I saw how little I'd earned last year. Then I wondered how I would have faired under...

Pardon Me?

George W. Bush's spokesman Ari Fleischer said last week that the president-elect has no plans to pardon Bill Clinton if -- as expected -- independent counsel Robert Ray indicts him when he leaves office next month. Most Republicans strongly favor Bush's position and are eager to see the legal system finally deliver Clinton his comeuppance. "I think if you pardon Bill Clinton, it would be a terrible way to start a new Bush administration," Republican strategist Ed Rollins said on Hardball . Most Democrats believe Clinton has suffered enough and take the opposing view, supporting a Bush pardon if Clinton is indicted. For liberals, this way of thinking is exactly wrong. Rather than help Clinton, a Bush pardon would mainly help Bush. The strongest opponents of a Clinton pardon are the same hardline Republicans who pushed his impeachment through the House. Bush campaigned on the promise that he could stand up to this group. But so far he hasn't. By dropping his preferred...

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