Justin Miller

 Justin Miller is a writing fellow for The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

Workers Centers: Organizing the 'Unorganizable'

From contract janitorial workers to day laborers, new strategies emerge for seeking justice on the job.

(Photo: CTUL/Minneapolis)
(Photo: CTUL) On November 28, 2014, workers for a company contracted to clean retail stores staged a Black Friday strike in front of a Target store in Minneapolis, just blocks from the big-box chain's headquarters. The action was organized by the CTUL workers center. M ost days Maricela Flores starts work at three in the morning—3:30 a.m. on a late day. Flores and her co-worker are tasked with cleaning an entire sprawling 125,000-square-foot Target store in six hours—every day. They sweep, buff, wipe, and scrub the store, erasing the evidence of the day of the previous day’s shoppers, who have streamed through the store. It’s hard work, certainly not glamorous—and at just $8 an hour, neither is the pay. As a single mother, Flores finds that’s barely enough to support her four children. “I always have to be making decisions about what to buy,” Flores tells me in Spanish, through an interpreter. “It’s very difficult to have to stretch every dollar.” Her family currently lives in a...

Top 5 Senate Races Where Dark Money and Outside Spending Ran Wild

Half a billion dollars was spent on U.S. Senate races this year, making this cycle the most expensive midterm campaign ever.

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This article has been corrected. G et ready for a week of pundits making claims of just what was proven by the results of the 2014 midterm elections. But one thing is already quite clear: Money is indeed a deciding factor. Half a billion dollars was spent on U.S. Senate races this year, making this cycle the most expensive midterm campaign ever. Much of that money was used by non-profit issue groups for what is known as “outside spending”—meaning money used for advertising and other forms of communication ostensibly to support an issue, but most often an issue that is framed in such a way to lend support to the group’s favored candidate. (These are the ads that often say something like: “Call Senator X and tell him to stop [supporting some allegedly terrible thing].") The 2014 cycle also shows how effectively outside spending groups can sway elections: When conservative groups outspend liberal groups (and sometimes even when they don’t), conservative candidates win. North Carolina,...

Can Green Party Candidate Howie Hawkins Make Cuomo Oppose Fracking?

He's certainly made it an issue. But progressives are divided on whether his gubernatorial bid could harm the Working Families Party.

(AP Photo/The Buffalo News, Dererk Gee)
(AP Photo/The Buffalo News, Dererk Gee) New York gubernatorial candidates, from left, Rob Astorino, Govornor Andrew Cuomo and Howie Hawkins participate in a debate sponsored by The Buffalo News and WNED-WBFO at WNED Studios in Buffalo, New York, Wednesday, October 22, 2014. A s voters in New York head to the polls today, there is little doubt who the state’s next governor will be. With a 20-point lead over Republican challenger Rob Astorino, incumbent Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, will slide comfortably into another term. Given the circumstances, it’d be easy to overlook Green Party candidate Howie Hawkins. But the 61-year-old UPS truck unloader and member of the Teamsters union is polling unusually high for a third-party candidate. According to the latest polls, he stands to garner nearly 10 percent of today’s vote; the last time Hawkins ran for governor in 2010, he pulled in about 1 percent. Hawkins’s performance is partly due to the significant number of progressives casting protest...

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