Kelly Nuxoll

Kelly Nuxoll is an editorial intern at the Prospect. She blogs about the presidential election for The Huffington Post.

Recent Articles

POLITICS CAN BREAK YOUR HEART.

When Hillary Clinton drops out of the race, the disappointment her supporters will feel will not be not trivial. A campaign, like a romance, inspires fantasies of the future; it idealizes another person; it makes you feel that you're part of something larger than yourself. And when it's over, your heart breaks.

"What we're talking about here is the phenomenon of attachment," explains Dr. Alan Lipman, a clinical psychologist. "When you lose that, you experience a loss of hope. To put it in medical terms, it's a bereavement."

Clinton, Obama, and the Gaming Industry

Where do the Democratic presidential candidates stand on gambling and regulation of the industry?

Although the gaming industry has long been a major campaign contributor, this year's early Nevada caucuses hauled it into the political theater and flooded it with neon light. Sen. Barack Obama, who won the endorsement of the casino workers' union -- but not necessarily the votes -- was challenged to declare his support for gaming. To demonstrate her commitment to the industry, Senator Clinton assembled a Nevada Business Coalition comprised largely of casino CEOs and stakeholders.

LIVE BLOGGING FROM CLINTON CAMPAIGN RALLY IN VIRGINIA.

I'm here in Arlington, blogging from the gym bleachers while the Washington and Lee High School band plays and the line outside stretches down the block and doubles back, like a small intestine.

More when Hillary Clinton arrives...

--Kelly Nuxoll

THIRD PLACE IS THE CHARM.

Polling a distant third in his native state, John Edwards has never looked so good. At a young voters forum in Columbia, Edwards addressed a modest gathering of 300 or so in a campaign sweatshirt and a pair of blue jeans, with an ink stain on the pocket. "I'm the underdog in this race," he said. "I don't have all the money, the media, the glitz."

CLINTON CONFRONTS RACE IN S.C. TODAY.

The Clinton campaign appears not only to be fighting hard in the state it hinted it might pass up, but also seeking to diffuse Obama's apparent advantage among African-American voters.