Lindsay Sobel

Lindsay Sobel came to the American Prospect in January
of 2000 as the first editor of the newly-launched American
Prospect Online
. Before joining the Prospect, she
worked for Slate magazine and covered Congress for
The Hill newspaper. Sobel earned her B.A. from the
University of Michigan and a master's degree in public policy from
Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Sobel grew up in Los Angeles and now lives in Cambridge, MA with
her husband Terry Klein.

Recent Articles

Comparison Shopping

George W. Bush has crisscrossed the country touting his top political priority--a giant tax cut. While consistently exaggerating the benefit to the middle class, he has unfailingly neglected to mention that he would give the wealthiest 1 percent of families 43 percent of the tax cuts. The tax break for the top 1 percent amounts to $774 billion over 10 years. Here is a look at what else the country could do with that whopping lump of cash over the next decade (mostly based on year 2000 expenditures). Shop for yourself. New Teachers. Pay almost two million teachers' salaries for 10 years. Student Aid. Increase the federal Pell Grant budget 88-fold or multiply federal student loans 18 times. Class-Size Reductions. Multiply federal spending for smaller classes in the nation's schools 193 times. Preschool. Fund preschool for all of the nation's four-year-olds almost eight times over (based on a cost estimate by the Brookings Institution's Isabel Sawhill). Crumbling Schools. Multiply...

Comparison Shopping:

Today, George W. Bush is traveling around the country touting his top priority -- a giant tax cut. But he exaggerates the benefit to the middle class, while neglecting to mention that he would give the top 1 percent of families 43 percent of the tax cuts. The tax cut for the wealthiest 1 percent amounts to $774 billion over 10 years. The American Prospect investigates what else the country could buy with that lump of cash (based on year 2000 expenditures) over the next decade. Shop for yourself. The money that Bush would spend on the top 1 percent could fund the following: Schools and Colleges New Teachers . Pay almost two million href="http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos069.htm">teachers' salaries for 10 years. Student Aid . Increase the federal Pell Grant budget 88-fold or multiply federal student loans 18 times. Class Size Reduction . Multiply federal funding for class size reduction 193 times. Preschool . Pay for preschool for all of the nation's four-year-olds almost eight times...

I'll Be the Judge:

As the trial opens today in a case in which plaintiffs charge Republican voting officials with illegally permitting GOP operatives to tamper with absentee voter applications in Seminole County, many observers are calling the case a dark horse that may crush George W. Bush's momentum. Presiding over the case is Judge Nikki Ann Clark, a five-foot-tall Democratic appointee who makes Republicans quake. If she rules against the Bush team, Clark could go so far as to throw out all of Republican-dominated Seminole County's 15,000 absentee ballots. If so, Gore would take a lead of several thousand votes in Florida. The most nail-biting fact for Republicans is that on November 17 -- just two weeks ago -- Florida Governor Jeb Bush passed over Judge Clark for a position on an appellate court. Having slighted her, they fear her. Fearing her, they're trying to crush her. Republicans have done everything in their power to get the case out of Judge Clark's courtroom. They...

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