Mark Goldberg

Mark Leon Goldberg is a Prospect senior correspondent. He writes at UN Dispatch.

Recent Articles

AS GOES CT-05....

AS GOES CT-05. Alec 's report on robocalls in the CT-05 race is terribly worrying. Mostlly because just before I read his post, I wrote the following: If the fifth congressional district in Connecticut goes to the Dems today, then I�ll predict a Democratic pickup of more than 21 seats. If the district goes Republican, the Dems will still win a majority of the House, but by a smaller margin -- possibly not greater than four. Why CT-05? In 2002 redistricting caused two incumbents, Republican Nancy Johnson and Democrat Jim Maloney to run against each other. Johnson won by about 10 points -- a larger margin than was expected at the time. And since then, Johnson has a gained reputation in the district for being something of a moderate. Johnson�s opponent is Chris Murphy -- a state senator from Waterbury, who by most accounts a fairly charismatic guy and attractive candidate. The most recent polls have shown the race to be neck and neck as Johnson�s lead evaporated over the summer. The...

SPOILER. Over...

SPOILER. Over on Bolton Watch Michael Roston does an excellent job blogging the race between Venezuela and Guatemala for a seat on the UN Security Council. So far, there have been more than 22 rounds of voting, with neither country winning the necessary two-thirds support from the 192 UN member states of the General Assembly. The United States is strongly backing Guatemala, (or, more accurately, strongly opposing Venezuela) for one of the Latin American seats on the Council. And in doing so, the United States has shown that its influence at the world body is remarkably limited. As Roston points out, Venezuela has consistently pulled at least 70 countries in the balloting. And for their part, the Guatemalan delegation does not appreciate being branded the �American candidate.� Nevertheless, it looks like Venezuela will be blocked and a compromise candidate will emerge from Latin America. This is a good thing. Lots of folks may not think it all that terrible should Hugo Chavez have a...

BUY THIS BOOK....

BUY THIS BOOK. Last week, Brookings held a great book launch event for Integrating Islam: Political and Religious Challenges in Contemporary France by Jonathan Laurence and Justin Vaisse. The book hit the Prospect �s office today, and it appears to be an exceedingly important read for anyone trying to understand how governments can help promote (or stunt) the integration process of Muslims immigrants to Europe. This book challenges alarmist takes from right-wing quarters that demographic and other factors are fostering an �Islamization� of Europe. Using France as a case study, Laurence and Vaisse flip that argument to show that Islam is becoming �Europeanized� instead; �French Islam,� they argue, �is replacing Islam in France.� Concurrently, the integration of Muslims in France is generally on a positive path. As they put it, �There is little reason to subscribe to the conventional view of an increasingly fractured society in which immigrants and citizens of Muslim origin form anti-...

ALLEN'S QUICK TURNAROUND...

ALLEN'S QUICK TURNAROUND Senator George Allen embraced his Jewish ancestry only yesterday. And it took him precisely 24 hours to play the anti-Semitic card . Yesterday, Wadhams accused Webb's campaign and liberal bloggers of anti-Semitism for raising the issue of the senator's religious background� Wadhams also accused Webb's campaign of mailing an anti-Semitic flier to Virginia voters during the state's Democratic primary this year. That flier depicted Webb's Jewish opponent, Harris Miller, with money coming out of his pockets. "They have been continuing that anti-Semitic strategy through their paid bloggers," Wadhams said. When it comes to ethnic baiting, Allen's the real victim here. --Mark Leon Goldberg

PASSING THE BUCK...

PASSING THE BUCK ON DARFUR. During this morning's press conference, the president had this to say about the United Nations and Darfur: The problem is, is that the United Nations hasn't acted. And so, I can understand why those who are concerned about Darfur are frustrated. I am. I'd like to see more robust United Nations action. What you'll hear is, "Well, the government of Sudan must invite the United Nations in for us to act." Well, there are other alternatives, like passing a resolution saying, "We're coming in with a U.N. force in order to save lives." �So you asked of levels of frustration. There's a particular level of frustration. First things first: Legally speaking, the Security Council does not need to pass another resolution to deploy peacekeepers to Darfur without Khartoum�s permission. However, the logistics on the ground in Darfur require that Khartoum grant its consent; the 17,000 troops authorized by Resolution 1706 somehow need to get to the remote region, and once...

Pages