Mark Huelsman

Mark Huelsman is a Senior Policy Analyst at Demos.

Recent Articles

Congress Didn't Pay a Lot to Go to College: Today's Students Shouldn't Either

Building photo: Architect of the Capitol - Dome: Carol M. Highsmith/Library of Congress
Architect of the Capitol This article originally appeared on the website of Demos . O ne of the oldest attack lines in politics is that a candidate or elected official is “out of touch” with the American people. The phrase, deployed often and by both parties, is often used to outline how a statement, voting record, or ideology is on the minority side of public opinion. In other cases, it’s used to target legislators who have served several terms, inferring that their tenure in office has left them too cozy and unresponsive to the needs of constituents. In the case of both Mitt Romney and John Kerry , it was used to infer that the very life experiences of a candidate left them out of touch with those of the “everyday American.” It’s designed to remove any and all appearances of empathy from the equation. In some cases, it’s actually true. Look no further than the cost of higher education. This week, the Senate was expected to (but looks like it no longer will) vote on a bill to allow...

College Sticker Price Still Matters. Here's Why.

Sure, there are "coupons" like scholarships and grants, but sticker price still has a big impact on both the federal government and students.

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin In this Oct. 6, 2011 photo, a student dressed as the superhero "Master of Degrees," holds a ball and chain representing his college loan debt, during Occupy D.C. protests in Washington ahead of President Obama's announcement of new measures to ease the burden of student debt. This article originally appeared at Demos' Policy Shop. O ver on The Upshot at the New York Times, David Leonhardt throws a little cold (or maybe just “slightly cool”) water on the hysteria over rising tuition, noting (correctly) that the primary tuition inflation measure that the federal government used for years was based on the average sticker price of tuition, rather than the average price that students end up forking over to attend (which would include grants, scholarships, and the like). No one disputes that net prices are rising, and contrary to what Leonhardt infers, the federal government has been releasing net price figures for decades, but he’s right that the overall tuition...