Mark A. Thompson

Mark A. Thompson (Matsimela Mapfumo) is the host of Make It Plain, which airs Mondays through Fridays on SiriusXM Progress 127, 6-9 p.m. ET. Follow him on Twitter: @MakeItPlain

Recent Articles

Listen: Affirmative Action 'Race or Place' Debate on SiriusXM's 'Make It Plain'

The Prospect's ongoing discussion on how to save affirmative action takes to the airwaves with a spirited discussion between Sheryll Cashin and Richard Rothstein.

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Scroll down for audio. When Prospect contributing writer Richard Rothstein penned a critical review of Sheryll Cashin's book, Place Not Race: A New Vision of Opportunity in America (Beacon) , it touched off a debate between the principals in an exchange of letters on The American Prospect website. Mark Thompson, host of the SiriusXM Progress show, Make It Plain , invited the rivals to take their debate live on the August 5 edition of the program. In her book, Cashin argues for a new approach to affirmative action in college admissions, one that gives primacy to circumstances other than race, including family wealth, proximity of the family home to high-poverty areas, and other measures of need. Thompson was joined in moderating the debate by Prospect Senior Editor Adele Stan, who appears on the program on Tuesday nights. Richard Rothstein Richard Rothstein is a Prospect contributing editor, a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute, and senior fellow at the Chief Justice...

All of a Piece: Donald Sterling, Cliven Bundy and the Supreme Court of the United States

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B eginning with the April 22 decision by the Supreme Court of the United States allowing affirmative action’s fate to be decided at state ballot boxes, followed 24 hours later by rancher Cliven Bundy’s comments on slavery’s positive attributes, followed 48 hours later by Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling’s plantation master attitude on display in a recorded telephone conversation attributed to him, this past week has been hell for African Americans. So much for post-racialism. During the conversation in which a man said to be Sterling demands that his girlfriend not be seen in the company of African Americans--nor even attend Clippers games in the company of black friends-- saying : “We live in a culture.” He goes on to argue for adherence to the rules of prejudice that exist within the culture. Yet another aspect of that culture, the one Sterling says we all live in, is a news cycle that enables each of these stories to supersede the other solely on the basis of...