Megan Twohey

Megan Twohey is a writer in Washington. She was a staff writer for the National Journal and The Moscow Times.

Recent Articles

Gunfight, Utah-Style

B y many indications, the gun-control cause would seem dead in America. Democrats, traditional champions of the cause, have been shrinking from the issue for fear that an anti-gun image would do them more harm than good at the polls. The gun lobby, whose membership and bank account grow bigger by the day, has successfully muscled through state legislatures laws that make it easier for people to buy and carry weapons. And the National Rifle Association certainly has a friend in U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft, who recently reversed the Department of Justice's long-standing position on the Second Amendment and now argues that American citizens have a constitutional right to own guns. But a backfire in an unlikely place -- Utah -- suggests what can happen when the gun lobby overreaches. In this most Republican of states, where the Legislature has long been an errand boy for the NRA, conservative judges and the president of the state university are resisting new gun laws. At least one...

Who Vouches for Vouchers?

I f you happened upon the newspaper, radio, and television ads last year, you might have assumed they were the work of a conservative organization. After all, they spotlighted black students and their parents touting an idea close to the hearts of many Republicans: government-funded vouchers for tuition at private and parochial schools. The tagline for the multimillion-dollar ad campaign, however, was this: "Parental school choice is widespread -- unless you're poor." The sponsor of these ads is a controversial group called the Black Alliance for Educational Options (BAEO). Founded in August of 2000, BAEO supports vouchers along with other education options for low-income parents, such as charter schools and home schooling. But the group only advocates vouchers targeted to low-income parents. It does not defend the "universal voucher" scheme that conservatives favor, and which some fear would leave public schools to founder while white middle- and upper-class parents combine public...

Some Friend:

O n Thursday, President George W. Bush arrives in Moscow to meet with his Russian counterpart and pal, President Vladimir Putin, and to "liquidate the legacy of the Cold War" by signing a new arms-control treaty that will reduce both countries' nuclear arsenals. Indeed, Bush -- who has made it clear that he is very proud of his close relationship with Putin -- seems to view the upcoming visit as a crowning moment for the two leaders. Last year, Bush boasted that he had seen Putin's soul. And since the terrorist attacks on the United States, he has praised Putin repeatedly for supporting the U.S. military campaign in Afghanistan, pointing out many times that Putin was the first foreign leader to call after September 11. Bush has accepted the air corridors and intelligence that Putin has offered him with open arms. But don't be fooled by Bush's bragging. The treaty he will sign in Moscow is high on symbolism and short on substance. So is Bush's half of the friendship with Putin. Since...