Michael Tomasky

Michael Tomasky is the American editor-at-large of the Guardian (UK). He was executive editor of the Prospect from 2003 to 2006.

Recent Articles

MLK.

MLK. Shouldn�t a liberal magazine�s Web site note that today is the anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King ? There, I�ve done it. I was seven years old, and I have a very clear memory of my parents howling in pain upon hearing the news. If you�ve never been to the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, where it happened -- it�s now the National Civil Rights Museum -- then get yourself down, or up, there (I see that it�s been expanded since I visited). It�s moving and even chilling. The walking tour through the museum concludes in the hallway outside the room King was staying in. You can look into the room through plexiglass, walk out on to the balcony and stand where he stood, and see the rooftop where James Earl Ray was standing. I see from this Wikipedia entry that Ray had fled the country and was apprehended at Heathrow Airport, interestingly enough, on June 8, 1968 -- two days after Bobby Kennedy was killed. Don�t trust aging lefties who tell you �68 was a good year because...

A Nomination to be Earned

I'll tell you what I liked about Hillary Clinton, and liked a lot, back in 1999, when she started her first Senate campaign. She worked really hard because she knew she had to work really hard. If she was going to persuade New Yorkers to accept an out-of-stater as their senator; if she was going to learn about how federal policy played out, in all its complexity, in the city, suburbs, and upstate regions; if she was going to hack her way through the obstacle course placed before her by a crazed right wing and a frenzied media -- her answer to all those challenges was hard work. Showing up, repeatedly. Being accessible to voters. Acknowledging, as she did at her maiden appearance at Pat Moynihan's farm in July 1999, that she had a lot to learn, and then learning it. She was, in a word, humble. When she finally won, most of the experts ignored the evidence of how she'd won and immediately began predicting that she'd be an arrogant senator, using her celebrity and Secret Service detail...

I'VE GOT A THEORY.

I'VE GOT A THEORY. I'm traveling and haven't been doing my normal quotient of blog reading, so maybe others have said this. But: How sure are we that this 1984 - Hillary ad was made by an Obama "supporter"? Because when I saw it, my immediate reaction was that it was made by a winger. It's conservatives who have this Orwell ian view of HRC -- they think she wants the state to control everything, she wants to take away your babies so they can be raised in state orphanages where the party line will be piped through the sound system, and so forth. Think of the mental connections the person who did this ad needed to make. He or she needed to be sitting around thinking that a Clinton presidency would take us to Orwell's Oceania. It really strikes me as a conservative's dot-connecting. Plus it follows that, at least in my anecdotal experience, most wingers think Hillary is the Dems' most formidable candidate, so one of their number doing a pro-Obama thing makes sense on that level, too. --...

Remember the 62

I bet that when David Obey lost his temper last week, he was thinking in part of a number (politicians are always thinking of numbers) that I haven't seen at all in the press during these discussions about what the Democrats should do on Iraq. The number is 62, and it's the number of House Democrats who represent districts that George W. Bush carried in 2004. I have a map up on my screen as I write showing the districts in question -- districts, of course, on which the Democrats' House majority depends. In Oklahoma, Kansas, Utah, and Colorado; Minnesota, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, both Dakotas, and Michigan; all 11 states of the Confederacy; California, Oregon, and Washington; Ohio and Kentucky and West Virginia and Pennsylvania and even New Hampshire and New York, Democrats are sitting in red districts -- where they won, in many cases, narrow victories. By way of contrast, how many House Republicans represent districts that John Kerry won in 2004? All of eight. You don't have to...

After Scooter

In the hours of television I watched in the wake of the Scooter Libby verdict Tuesday, I found this exchange, between MSNBC host Tucker Carlson and A.B. Stoddard of The Hill , the most interesting (Stoddard, a reporter, was paired with former RNC spokesman Jim Dyke -- balance, baby!): Carlson: Will there be real Democratic investigations, led by Congress, into the genesis of this war and will they result in action? Stoddard: Well, they were talking for months about how they were going to be looking at it, and so this might increase the appetite for oversight of pre-war intelligence again. But then again, that is looking back. And they can busy themselves with that, but they have to look forward. And the big question that the base is asking is what are they going to do on the war? It's too early to say whether Stoddard's view is the conventional wisdom among Democrats. But it shouldn't be. Ending the war, like it or not, will have to wait. Congress can't end a war that a president is...

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