Michelle Goldberg

Michelle Goldberg is a senior correspondent at The American Prospect. She is also the author of Kingdom Coming and The Means of Reproduction.

Recent Articles

EUROPE’S BIRTH STRIKE.

A few days ago, Matthew Yglesias and Ross Douthat were discussing the specter of declining population in Russia, and whether that posed a threat to Russia’s future.

Is Foreign Aid a Bad Thing?

Dead Aid author Dambisa Moyo is right to be critical of the current state of foreign aid. But she's dead wrong in calling for it to be cut off within five years, which would be catastrophic for Africa.

It's not surprising that Dambisa Moyo has become an overnight intellectual celebrity, especially on the right. At a time when capitalism is in worse repute than it has been in decades, here comes a sharp, highly credentialed, and -- not incidentally -- gorgeous African woman hymning the salvific promise of free trade and international capital markets.

Ending the Compromise Era on AIDS

The removal of Mark Dybul as head of the federal AIDS program shows that the era of compromising with the religious right on global HIV prevention is over.

President Bush walks with Mark Dybul, his appointee to head PEPFAR, on Friday, Nov. 30, 2007. The Obama transition team had originally asked Dybul to stay on. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)

When Mark Dybul, erstwhile head of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR, was asked to clean out his desk late last month, it was a stark manifestation of the different styles that Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton bring to governing.

How Bush's AIDS Program is Failing Africans

The president's much-lauded AIDS initiative has succeeded in saving lives through treatment. But its abstinence- focused prevention programs have put many more lives in jeopardy.

NAIROBI, Kenya -- On July 5, Beatrice Were, the founder of Uganda's National Community of Women Living with HIV and AIDS, stood before hundreds of other HIV-positive women in Nairobi's vaulted city hall and denounced the Bush administration's AIDS policies.

Like many in attendance, Were contracted HIV from her husband, a common occurrence in a region where women make up the majority of new infections and marriage is a primary risk factor. For those like her, the White House's AIDS prevention mantra -- which prescribes abstinence and marital fidelity, with condoms only for "high risk" groups like prostitutes and truck drivers -- is a sick joke.

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