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Doing Without Wall Street I can't tell you how happy I was to see the cover of your April issue. At Last! Someone was going to discuss the distressing Robert Rubin/Democratic Party connection. The article was most informative. It was gratifying to learn that President Clinton had at least an occasional moment of frustration at Democrats having to sell out to "a bunch of fucking bond traders" and become "Eisenhower Republicans," edifying to have affirmed that Hillary Clinton and Obama are securely in harness. And is there any way Edwards can do without Wall Street? Margit Johansson Boulder, Colorado Not Just Southern As Harold Meyerson points out, ["Wal-Mart Comes North," April 2007] the resistance encountered by the big retailer in Chicago, Los Angeles and other metropolitan regions constitutes but the latest battle waged between the low-wage, non-union Southern brand of U.S. capitalism and those elements of the polity that seek to sustain the labor standards and regulatory norms...

Correspondence

Who's Counting? In his review of Lapdogs: How the Press Rolled Over for Bush , [July/August 2006] Todd Gitlin writes that the phony accusation that Al Gore claimed to have invented the Internet appeared in the media more than 4,800 times during the 2000 presidential campaign. Gitlin does not explain how this number was calculated, nor does he indicate the exact time period covered or which media were included. However, a Lexis-Nexis search reveals only 19 mentions of the “Gore-invented-the-Internet” charge in major American newspapers between January 1, 2000, and Election Day. Moreover, the point of several of these articles was that Gore had never made such a claim but that he had been a strong supporter of the development of the Internet. Other articles in which the statement appeared were quoting a joke used by George Bush on the campaign trail. Gitlin's (and Boehlert's) claim that the media frequently and uncritically reported this accusation, like the accusation itself, appears...

Correspondence

Tar-Heel Tolerance Additional support for Hugo Adam Bedau's argument that public support for capital punishment is dwindling [“Death's Dwindling Dominion,” July 2004] comes from a new poll in North Carolina that Doble Research Associates has recently published. When given a choice between sentencing murderers to death or to life in prison without parole, plus a requirement that they work and make restitution to a fund for victims' families, support for capital punishment drops dramatically. When people have this option, only 26 percent support the death penalty; 64 percent favor life in prison plus restitution. Without that option, 59 percent of the people of North Carolina favor the death penalty. Further, by a margin of 63 percent to 28 percent, North Carolinians favor a temporary, two-year suspension on executing people on death row while the system's fairness is studied. Support for a suspension extends to all corners of the state, and includes men and women, Republicans and...

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