Patrick Caldwell

Patrick Caldwell is a writing fellow at The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

It's Getting Hot in Here

Fears of the Mayan apocalypse might have been for naught, but that doesn't mean 2012 went by without any new signs of our world's impending doom. On Tuesday the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that the United States experienced record temperatures in 2012 . Last year's average temperature of 55.3°F is a full one degree higher than 1998, the old record-holder. According to one study, weather stations across the country recorded 34,008 new daily highs, juxtaposed against a paltry 6,664 new record lows. Those warm days led to a variety of problems. Last year was also the 15 th driest year on the books, including a devastating summer drought that crippled much of the West and Midwest. The winters seem to grow milder each year; some cities like D.C. haven't seen substantial snowfall in nearly two years. Super-charged storms wrecked havoc throughout the year, culminating with Hurricane Sandy. But don't try telling Republican deniers. And don't hold your breath for...

A Long-Term Fiscal Slope

Liberals felt rightfully disgruntled with the president's capitulations during fiscal-cliff negotiations. Obama abandoned his hard-line stance that tax rates must be increased on incomes over $250,000. Instead the deal made the Bush tax cuts permanent for the vast majority of the country, with rates only rising for individuals earning over $400,000—hardly a sensible definition of the middle class. Yet as he gave up his leverage on automatic tax hikes, Obama's compromise bill punted the sequestration cuts until March 1 and left the necessary hike of the debt ceiling as a lingering threat for the nihilistic House Republicans to exploit for further cuts to discretionary spending. But along with the tax-rate hike on top incomes, Obama did win a few minor concessions when Congress averted the fiscal cliff. Emergency unemployment insurance for the long-term unemployed was extended until January 2014 and a host of tax credits for the poor and middle class were extended for five years, all...

Hurricane Christie

New Jersey governor Chris Christie has never been one to mince words—he became a conservative heartthrob during his first gubernatorial campaign thanks to a string of anti-union screeds that made the rounds on YouTube. But on Wednesday, Christie took aim at his fellow Republicans for their failure to pass a relief bill for the victims of Hurricane Sandy. “There is only one group to blame for the continued suffering of these innocent victims: the House majority and their Speaker John Boehner,” Christie said during a press conference today. Boehner had promised to introduce the bill following the fiscal-cliff impasse but adjourned the House Tuesday night without offering a vote. Christie took this as a betrayal, claiming that he called the House speaker four times last night to no avail. Despite Christie's 2016 aspirations, his lashing out at the national GOP isn't surprising. At the moment, he's more concerned with winning re-election later this year in his traditionally blue state; he...

Will John Boehner Lose the Speakership?

Flickr/Talk Radio News Service
Flickr/Talk Radio News Service The fiscal-cliff deal —which cleared the Senate by an overwhelming bipartisan majority earlier this week and passed the House late Tuesday—might end up costing House Speaker John Boehner his job. The legislation raises taxes on individuals earning more than $400,000 but cements the Bush tax cuts below that threshold. Only eight senators—five Republicans and three Democrats—dissented. But when the bill reached the House floor, conservatives revolted. The vast majority of House Democrats voted for the compromise measure while 64 percent of House Republicans—including Majority Leader Eric Cantor and Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy—voted against the bill. By introducing the compromise hammered out between Senate Republicans and the White House, Boehner violated the so-called "Hastert Rule," the operational norm by which only bills supported by the majority of the caucus in power are brought up for a vote. The timing couldn't be worse for Boehner. On Thursday,...

What Happens to a DREAM Deferred?

AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes
At first, it looked like 2012 would be another terrible year for immigration reform advocates. Mitt Romney won the Republican presidential primary by adopting a xenophobic, right-wing platform, advocating for policies against immigrants so terrible they led to self-deportation. Meanwhile Barack Obama continued to deport undocumented workers at an unprecedented pace—he’s sent 1.4 million people out of the country through July of this year—and failed to introduce comprehensive legislation, as he’d promised. A brighter picture is emerging, however. In June, Obama signed an executive order called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), which operates like the failed DREAM Act would have. Obama ordered Homeland Security to lay off deportation proceedings against immigrants who came into the country as children and who have completed high school or served in the military. Immigrants who meet those qualifications can now request a reprieve to remain in the country. The government has...

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