Paul Waldman

Paul Waldman is a contributing editor for the Prospect and the author of Being Right is Not Enough: What Progressives Must Learn From Conservative Success.

Recent Articles

Gird Thy Loins; War Is Nigh

Turning the other cheek is for wimps.

Tonight at the Ronald Reagan presidential library—America's greatest library—Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal will deliver a speech that will be seen (probably correctly) as an early component of the Jindal for President '16 campaign. Its subject is an old favorite, the religious war currently being waged in America. It's partly Barack Obama's war on Christianity, but since Obama will be leaving office in a few years, it's important to construe the war as something larger and more eternal. The point, as it is with so many symbolic wars, isn't the victory but the fight.

Marriage Equality Opponents Left With Nothing But Tradition

Now there's a traditional marriage. I believe that's Tasha Yar presiding. (Flickr/TrekRadio)

2013 was not a good year for opponents of marriage equality. Maryland, Delaware, Rhode Island, Illinois, New Mexico, California, New Jersey, Hawaii, and Minnesota were added to the list of states allowing same-sex marriage. The Defense of Marriage Act was struck down by the Supreme Court. And if anything, 2014 is shaping up to move even faster. Earlier this week, a judge in Kentucky ruled that the state must honor same-sex marriages performed in other states. And last night, a federal judge in Virginia struck down the ban on same-sex marriage the state passed in 2006.

The judge stayed her decision until a higher court can rule on the inevitable appeal. But with these cases piling up, it seems obvious that the Supreme Court is going to rule sooner rather than later on the legality of same-sex marriage bans, something they've been trying to avoid until now. And with the continued evolution of American culture and public opinion in favor of equality, the chance that those bans will be declared unconstitutional seems to grow every day.

At this point, advocates of marriage equality can afford to spare a moment of sympathy for their opponents, to say: look, we understand that change can be unsettling.

America In Decline

What freedom looks like.

I've always held that if there's one thing that proves America's superiority to all other nations, it's the quality of our television. Sure, other countries might be able to put together a "Borgen" or "The Returned" now and again, but nobody can match the good old U.S. of A. for our sheer quantity of top-shelf, high-production-value programming.

But others might find proof of America's dominance not in our cultural hegemony but in our military hegemony. For years since September 11, we've been able to say proudly (or something) that we don't just spend more than every other country on Earth on our planes and bombs and fighting ships, we spend more than every other country on Earth combined. But if that's your measure of American greatness, you might want to sit down.

Daily Meme: Stuck With It

  • Since millions of East Coast residents are stuck at home under a blanket of wet snow today, we take a look at being stuck, for better or for worse.
  • Signups under the Affordable Care Act are proceeding along nicely, with 3.3 million people having gotten private insurance and another 6 million signing up for Medicaid in the last few months. Republicans haven't yet come to terms with the fact that they're stuck with Obamacare, whether they like it or not.

Just How Much Do Republicans Hate Unions?

The VW plant in Chattanooga. (Photo courtesy of Volkswagen USA)

If you ask Republicans about their antipathy toward unions, they'll say that letting workers bargain collectively reduces a company's ability to act efficiently in the marketplace. If you knew anything about business, the market advocates will patiently explain, you'd understand that unions, with all their rules and conditions and strike threats, only make it harder for the company to make its products. Let management make decisions about things like wages and working conditions, and the result will be higher profits and more jobs, which will benefit everyone. In almost all cases, the corporation agrees; after all, union workers always earn better wages than their non-union counterparts, and they give power to the employees, which no CEO wants.

What most people probably don't realize is that this inherently hostile relationship between management and unions isn't something that's inherent in capitalism. In fact, in many places where there are capitalists making lots of money, corporations work—now hold on here while I blow your mind—cooperatively with unions. One of those places is Germany, and one of the biggest German companies, Volkswagen, is right now embroiled in a union election in Tennessee that has turned into a bizarre spectacle that is showing the true colors of American conservatism. If you thought conservative were just laissez faire capitalists, seeking freedom for businesses to create prosperity, you're dead wrong. What they actually want is something much uglier.

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