Paul Waldman

Paul Waldman is the Prospect's daily blogger and senior writer. He also blogs for the Plum Line at the Washington Post, and is the author of Being Right is Not Enough: What Progressives Must Learn From Conservative Success.

Recent Articles

Friday Music Break

Flickr/Kyota
For today's edition of "Musicians Who Died Too Young Doing Schoolhouse Rock," we have Jeff Buckley with "Three is a Magic Number." Yes it is. And a bonus link: here 's De La Soul's version.

Where Does Rick Santorum Go When the Campaign Is Over?

Not the future leader of the GOP (Flickr/DonkeyHotey)
Rick Santorum has benefited from excellent timing. Unlike the other not-Romneys who ran for president this year, he had the good fortune of not catching the imagination of the Republican base until late in the primaries, after Michele Bachmann, Herman Cain, Rick Perry, and Newt Gingrich had all had their brief moments as the alternative to the likely eventual nominee. By the time the voters got around to Santorum, there was just nobody else left, which has enabled him to have his moment in the sun at the end of the primaries, just where you'd want it to be if you're going to parlay your loss into a lucrative and influential career opportunity. Today The Washington Post makes the case , without much in the way of evidence, that "Santorum has, after ten weeks of contests, all but claimed the title of leader of the conservative wing of the GOP." I don't buy it. First of all, conservatives in the GOP aren't a "wing." If anything, it's the establishment that's a "wing," in that it...

More on Mitt Romney's Lies

(Flickr/Gage Skidmore)
Is Mitt Romney a guy who tells a bunch of lies, or is he a liar? That the question Jonathan Chait asks, and he winds up sort-of defend ing Romney, saying that his lies, many of which revolve around his effort to deny his own history, have been practical in nature. "It's Romney's bad luck that fate has dictated his only path to the presidency lies in being a huge liar," Chait says, so those lies don't tell us much about what's deep in Romney's character. There are two problems here. The first is that Romney lies about President Obama as often as he lies about himself. It's just that when he does the former, he does it with actual squirming (if he's sitting down), the phoniest smile you've ever seen, and panic in his eyes, so it's really obvious. The second problem is that Chait's distinction applies to pretty much every political liar in history. There's always a reason why a politician lies. The biggest lies come when they get caught doing something they shouldn't have (Nixon with...

The Campaign Film: A Look Back

1984 Reagan convention video
Tonight, the Obama campaign will release a sort-of-anticipated 17-minute video, telling the story of the Obama administration's challenges and achievements in an effort to help frame the debate about how to understand its first term. I'll offer some comments on it tomorrow, but for now I thought I'd take the opportunity to assemble some of these videos from prior campaigns. Presidential campaigns have aired ads since the 1952 campaign, and some of the early ones felt more like documentary films than ads. Here's a dynamite segment from a 1964 Barry Goldwater film, talking about the spread of smut and crime, full of sex shops and young people doing The Twist: But the real ancestor of what the Obama campaign has put together is the 1984 convention video produced for Ronald Reagan. Titled "A New Beginning," it was interesting enough to produce at least one book of film criticism on it. Here's the first half: And this is the second half (even though it's labeled Part 1), which contains a...

The Horns of Mitt's Dilemma

Republican VP candidates: Feel the excitement!
The other day I rather superficially raised the issue of whom Mitt Romney might choose for his vice-presidential nominee and said it would no doubt be some boring white guy, in keeping with Mitt's risk-aversion. But after thinking about it some more, I've decided this may turn out to be more complicated than it appears. I'm assuming, of course, that Romney will be the nominee, something that has perhaps gone from a near certainty to a high likelihood this week. In any case, since everyone will be talking about this for a brief period starting in a few months, and we here at the Prospect like to keep you not just up with today's news but at the bleeding edge of tomorrow, it's worth giving this another look. Most presidential candidates have one problem they want to solve with their choice. Sometimes it's the relatively inexperienced outsider choosing the old Washington hand—Barack Obama with Joe Biden, George W. Bush with Dick Cheney, Michael Dukakis with Lloyd Bentsen, Jimmy Carter...

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