Paul Waldman

Paul Waldman is a contributing editor for the Prospect and the author of Being Right is Not Enough: What Progressives Must Learn From Conservative Success.

Recent Articles

Obama and Iraq.

Marc Ambinder reminds us of something in advance of President Obama's Oval Office speech:

We forget how integral Sen. Barack Obama's decision to oppose the Iraq war was to his own political awakening, and how many contortions Hillary Clinton had to untwist in order to justify her own support for the war authority, and how, by the day of the general election, given the success of the surge (or the success of JSOC's counterterrorism efforts), Iraq was no longer a central voting issue. Voters seemed to exorcise that demon in 2006, when they voted Democrats into Congress.

More Depressing Poll Results.

More from today's depressing poll results, from Newsweek we learn that not only do many Americans think Barack Obama is Muslim (24 percent in this one), but majorities of Republicans not only think Obama is favoring Muslims over other Americans, he's also sympathetic to al-Qaeda's goals. I made a couple of charts:

Whose Media Bias?

Progressives' attempt to reshape the media has had some successes, but the failures may be more instructive.

In this Aug. 24, 2004, photo, former Air America radio host Al Franken is seen during a news conference in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

When Air America finally shut its doors early this year, it wasn't front-page news. Plagued by mismanagement and multiple ownership changes, the progressive radio network had failed to turn its respectable ratings into profits, even though it made a U.S. senator out of its first marquee personality, Al Franken, and a television star out of its last, Rachel Maddow. When it finally went off the air, most of the people who were supposed to be its target audience probably didn't notice.

Be All You Can Be, World Edition.

Gawker has given us a fascinating collection of military recruiting ads from around the world, and like much culture these days, they show a strong American influence while nevertheless retaining their local character.

They're With Stupid

Anti-intellectualism rears its head.

Sarah Palin (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Dwight Eisenhower once defined an intellectual as "a man who takes more words than are necessary to tell more than he knows." While Eisenhower was perfectly happy to have people mistake his lack of eloquence for a modest intelligence, he would never have gone so far as to proclaim himself proud to be dumb or uninformed.

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