Paul Waldman

Paul Waldman is a contributing editor for the Prospect and the author of Being Right is Not Enough: What Progressives Must Learn From Conservative Success.

Recent Articles

Be All You Can Be, World Edition.

Gawker has given us a fascinating collection of military recruiting ads from around the world, and like much culture these days, they show a strong American influence while nevertheless retaining their local character.

They're With Stupid

Anti-intellectualism rears its head.

Sarah Palin (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Dwight Eisenhower once defined an intellectual as "a man who takes more words than are necessary to tell more than he knows." While Eisenhower was perfectly happy to have people mistake his lack of eloquence for a modest intelligence, he would never have gone so far as to proclaim himself proud to be dumb or uninformed.

Chart of the Day: Is Our Grandparents Tweeting?

A few years ago, The Onion did a story titled "Google Launches 'The Google' For Older Adults," in which a spokesman explained, "All you have to do to turn the website on is put the little blinking line thing in the cyberspace window at the top of the screen, type 'thegoogle.com,' and press 'return'—although it will also recognize http.wwwthegoogle.com, google.aol, and 'THEGOOGLE' typed into a Word document." But it looks like our elders may be getting more interweb savvy:

It's About Who You Are.

In my continuing effort to point out when I agree with conservatives, Ross Douthat is absolutely right in his assessment of Glenn Beck:

Now more than ever, Americans love leaders who seem to validate their way of life. This spirit of self-affirmation was at work in evangelicals' enduring support for Bush, in the enthusiasm for the Dean campaign among the young, secular and tech-savvy, and now in the devotion that Palin inspires among socially conservative women. The Obama campaign raised it to an art form, convincing voters that by merely supporting his candidacy, they were proving themselves cosmopolitan and young-at-heart, multicultural and hip. 

Have We Met the Next Basil Marceaux?

The great thing about primaries is that anyone can run. You don't have to be approved by the party bosses or be some polished, experienced candidate. All you need is a song and a dream. And here (via Ben Smith) is a guy -- one Chris Young, running for mayor of Providence -- who's got himself a song:

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