Paul Waldman

Paul Waldman is a contributing editor for the Prospect and the author of Being Right is Not Enough: What Progressives Must Learn From Conservative Success.

Recent Articles

More GOP Liberalization.

That former Republican Party chairman and manager of George W. Bush 's re-election campaign Ken Mehlman revealed that he is gay isn't a surprise; as many have noted, Mehlman's identity was widely known in Washington for some time. But what may be surprising is that the response from Republicans has been rather muted. The response from Ed Gillespie, another former chairman seems typical: Yeah, we know, but we're still opposed to gay marriage. It all reminded me of a column I wrote two years ago, on the occasion of Larry Craig 's unfortunate encounter with the police in a bathroom in the Minneapolis airport: The Republican Party of which Craig was such an honored member can abide many things -- dishonesty, incompetence, corruption, even a taste for prostitutes. All manner of sins can be forgiven, so long as the sinner proclaims his fealty to the cause. But there are some lines that may not be crossed. Over the last few years they have invested so deeply in anti-gay bigotry that they had...

The GOP Finding Its Voice on Foreign Policy.

Greg Sargent argues that with the controversy over the Cordoba House, "the Cheney-ites are winning the battle over the future direction of GOP foreign policy." If it's true, it shouldn't be too surprising. Within a complex party, particular issues are often ceded to the group that cares about them the most. And apart from a Likudnik approach to the Middle East, which is now practically universal on the right, lots of Republicans don't have much to say about foreign policy. If you had to describe the prevailing GOP approach to foreign affairs, what would you say? It's hard to know, even with regard to some places where we're rather heavily engaged. What's the Republican position on Afghanistan? On the future of our relationship with China? The easiest thing to fall back on is the division of the world into good guys and bad guys, which may get you to a Palinesque level of understanding, but it doesn't give much guidance as to what the country should do . For instance, Mahmoud...

A Tea Party Backlash Within the GOP?

Is the Tea Party the new religious right? By which I mean, the grassroots group the GOP uses to mobilize voters, then once in office, keeps serving up symbolic expressions of love without much to show in the way of actual policy goodies, while hoping to keep the crazies under wraps. The fact is that the Republican establishment has always been a bit uncomfortable with the religious right, as much as they need them to win elections. And that establishment may become increasingly unsettled with the Tea Party. In today's Washington Post , Michael Gerson , former speechwriter for George W. Bush , unloads on the Tea Party, in terms its members will no doubt find elitist: "In the normal course of events, political movements begin as intellectual arguments, often conducted for years in serious books and journals. To study the Tea Party movement, future scholars will sift through the collected tweets of Sarah Palin ." Oh, snap! He also criticizes them for not understanding the history they...

Bloggers, Taxes, and City Budgets.

You may have heard about this crazy story from Philadelphia, in which the city is sending letters to bloggers, demanding that they pay a $300 "business privilege tax" because of their income from blogging. This rang a chord with me, because a few years ago, long after I had moved to D.C., I got a letter from the city of Philadelphia informing me that I owed them money from my unpaid business privilege tax. This happened because I reported some modest royalty income from a book I had written while living in Philadelphia, and the city decided that by writing a book I was operating a business within the city, and therefore needed to pay a tax for the privilege. Needless to say, I thought this was an outrage of the highest order. So I feel these bloggers' pain. Generally speaking, I'm a fan of taxes (yeah, I said it!). Though nobody particularly likes paying them, and we can and should argue about how they should be best apportioned, any mature citizen ought to realize that we get some...

Chaff Production at All-Time High.

(Flickr/ Zawesome ) Paul Carr of Techcrunch makes a bold move (particularly for someone who writes for a tech blog) and shuts down all of his social media accounts except for Twitter. And yeah, that kind of defeats the purpose, but the reason for doing this is that he feels that he's been losing his posterity: social media, particularly Twitter, has made his public thoughtstream an endless river of decontextualized, purposeless trivia: "I am learning a lot about pens." reads one update from last year. What does that even mean? "Ok, that's quite enough of all this. I'm going out", reads another. Enough of all what? And where was I going? Of course, the fact that I'm a particularly boring tweeter doesn't help, but look at anyone's Twitter account and it's the same story – 140 characters simply doesn't give enough depth or breadth to commit events, memories or feelings to the permanent record. I'd argue that the problem isn't that we don't know what he had had enough of on that day, or...

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