Paul Waldman

Paul Waldman is a contributing editor for the Prospect and the author of Being Right is Not Enough: What Progressives Must Learn From Conservative Success.

Recent Articles

Ignore the Chicken Littles.

Marjorie Margolies ' op-ed in yesterday's Washington Post , which was a salutary reminder of the meaning of votes in Congress, should also remind us of something else: When Republicans make predictions of terrible events to come, they are almost certainly wrong. This is important because if health-care reform passes on Sunday, they'll be saying not only that Democrats will lose their majorities in Congress because of it but also that jobs will disappear, costs will skyrocket, the deficit will explode, seniors will be executed by government bureaucrats, vicious animals will burst from their cages and carry off our children, Kevin Federline will release more albums, and who knows what other nightmarish events will ensue. When Margolies made the 1993 vote that probably cost her a seat in Congress -- in favor of Bill Clinton 's first budget -- Republicans sounded a lot like they do today. The budget (which cut taxes for middle-class people and raised them slightly on the rich) passed...

Deliver Us From Texas.

If you reside in the reality-based portions of the United States, you've probably looked on with amazement at the latest iteration of the regular battles over Texas textbooks. Briefly: because Texas is a huge market for textbooks, the standards the state's education board sets influence what books are sold across the country. And the current board is dominated not just by conservatives but by people who are, well, nuts. As The Washington Post put it today, according to the changes they just adopted, "The curriculum plays down the role of Thomas Jefferson among the founding fathers, questions the separation of church and state, and claims that the U.S. government was infiltrated by Communists during the Cold War. ... Discussions ranged from whether President Reagan should get more attention (yes), whether hip-hop should be included as part of lessons on American culture (no), and whether President of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis' s inaugural address should be studied alongside...

Why It's Impossible to Interview Karl Rove.

NPR's Terry Gross interviewed Karl Rove yesterday about his new book (spoiler alert: George W. Bush was strong and resolute!) and showed why he may be the most difficult person in politics to interview effectively. Gross wasn't trying to "get" Rove -- along with some tougher questions, she also asked him about his youthful interest in politics, about his early relationship with Bush, and other things on which Rove might have something interesting to say. But Rove has an almost impenetrable style. He starts every answer by challenging the premise of the host's question. If the question relays someone's criticism of him, then he turns that criticism around on the person who made it: Gross : Let me read something that Todd Purdum wrote in Vanity Fair in December of 2006. He described an approach of campaigning that "always found villains - gays, unions, trial lawyers, liberals, elitists, terrorists" - and that candidates "could both use this to crack the electorate at a vulnerable spot...

Amanpour to Host "This Week"? Let's Hope So.

So The New York Times ' Media Decoder blog is reporting that "ABC News is close to concluding a deal to install the longtime CNN foreign correspondent Christiane Amanpour as the new host of its Sunday political discussion show "This Week.'" This is extremely good news, for a couple of reasons. First, it's nice to see that a woman can get in this chair (Amanpour would follow CNN's Candy Crowley , who recently took over their Sunday program "State of the Union"). Second, Amanpour has always been known as an excellent reporter and a tough interviewer. But more important, Amanpour brings a profoundly different perspective than the other Sunday show hosts. As the Times piece says: One concern raised by at least one of these contacts has been that she is not primarily known for reporting on Washington or American politics. But one ABC News staff member said that Ms. Amanpour had been convinced that she could make the switch from international to political reporting. Let me be the first to...

Petraeus Goes Off the Republican Reservation.

Remember how Republicans used to gaze in worship at Gen. David Petraeus ' stony visage, dreaming of the day he would run for the GOP nomination for president? When an insult directed the Great Man's way was enough to generate a congressional resolution of condemnation ? Well, I think we can start packing up the boxes at the "Draft Petraeus Committee." First, the general informed his superiors that the continued Israeli-Palestinian conflict -- and particularly Israeli intransigence -- is harming U.S. military interests in the Middle East. Not quite what conservatives want to hear. In their current dogma, everything that's wrong in that conflict is the Palestinians' fault, and Israel is without sin. Then, Petraeus came to Capitol Hill today and said this about the ban on gay Americans serving in the military: “I believe the time has come to consider a change to Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, but I think it should be done in a thoughtful and deliberative matter that should include the conduct of...

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