Paul Waldman

Paul Waldman is the Prospect's daily blogger, and a contributing editor. He also blogs for the Plum Line at the Washington Post, and is the author of Being Right is Not Enough: What Progressives Must Learn From Conservative Success.

Recent Articles

Petraeus Goes Off the Republican Reservation.

Remember how Republicans used to gaze in worship at Gen. David Petraeus ' stony visage, dreaming of the day he would run for the GOP nomination for president? When an insult directed the Great Man's way was enough to generate a congressional resolution of condemnation ? Well, I think we can start packing up the boxes at the "Draft Petraeus Committee." First, the general informed his superiors that the continued Israeli-Palestinian conflict -- and particularly Israeli intransigence -- is harming U.S. military interests in the Middle East. Not quite what conservatives want to hear. In their current dogma, everything that's wrong in that conflict is the Palestinians' fault, and Israel is without sin. Then, Petraeus came to Capitol Hill today and said this about the ban on gay Americans serving in the military: “I believe the time has come to consider a change to Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, but I think it should be done in a thoughtful and deliberative matter that should include the conduct of...

The End of Process Is Nigh.

In case you haven't been paying attention to the moment-by-moment maneuvering over health care, the latest twist is a suggestion that the House might pass the bill using a parliamentary device known as a "self-executing rule," which works like this: Instead of having a vote on the Senate bill and then a vote on the package of fixes to the Senate bill (the latter of which would then be passed by the Senate), the House will have one combined vote, in which they will "deem" the Senate bill passed and pass the package of fixes. Naturally, Republicans are reacting as though this is a crime on the level of genocide, even though -- you know what's coming -- it turns out Republicans used the technique all the time when they were in charge. The supposed purpose behind this is to allow members who don't like the Senate bill to avoid casting a vote directly on the Senate bill. The idea that they would somehow insulate themselves from attacks on the particulars of the Senate bill is pretty...

This Crazy Goes To 11.

(Flickr/ Jonathan McIntosh ) Is Fox News' Glenn Beck going to turn out to be the Icarus of the current political moment, flying too close to that giant fiery ball of crazy in the sky and falling back down to Earth? He's gotten into some trouble recently after attacking churches who advocate social justice, which is ... well, nearly every Christian denomination. "I beg you look for the words social justice or economic justice on your church Web site," he said. "If you find it, run as fast as you can. Social justice and economic justice, they are code words. ... Am I advising people to leave their church? Yes!" He went on to explain what those are code words for: socialism and Nazism. Yes, Nazism. Churches from across the political and theological spectrum have condemned Beck, and even representatives of his own Mormon faith were appalled. Then we learned yesterday from Howard Kurtz that "there is a deep split within Fox between those -- led by Chairman Roger Ailes -- who are supportive...

More Than Words

Republicans have won the language battle on health care. But it's beginning to look like all they care about is talk.

As much as politicians like to imagine themselves men and women of action, what they mostly do is talk. They talk to the cameras, they talk to constituents, they talk to contributors, they talk to each other. It's almost impossible to be a successful politician without the ability to lodge words and images in the public mind. The result is that a really adept politician has to be part linguist and part semiotician. This is particularly true when you're out of power and there's so little you can actually accomplish. As Republicans are faced with the possibility that this week, Democrats might actually succeed in passing their most critical domestic initiative, is their mastery of the symbolic really enough? Without question, the GOP won the language battle over health care. With a few vivid terms, like "government takeover" and "death panels," Republicans captured the public's imagination in an otherwise dull policy debate. When they turned their argument to process, they grabbed...

Man-On-Horse in Arizona

Via Steve Benen , we see that former Rep. J.D. Hayworth , who is challenging John McCain in the Republican Senate primary in Arizona, has some interesting ideas about what gay marriage will lead to: "You see, the Massachusetts Supreme Court, when it started this move toward same-sex marriage, actually defined marriage -- now get this -- it defined marriage as simply, 'the establishment of intimacy,'" Hayworth said. "Now how dangerous is that? I mean, I don't mean to be absurd about it, but I guess I can make the point of absurdity with an absurd point -- I guess that would mean if you really had affection for your horse, I guess you could marry your horse. It's just the wrong way to go, and the only way to protect the institution of marriage is with that federal marriage amendment that I support." This kind of thing comes up with alarming frequency from Christian conservatives. For some of them, any issue of gay rights is about sex -- hot, steamy sex, so hot they can't stop thinking...

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