Phoebe Connelly

Phoebe Connelly is a former web editor of the Prospect. Previously, she was managing editor of In These Times. She writes on political culture, human rights and feminism.

Recent Articles

HILLARY HOME RUN....

HILLARY HOME RUN. It’s a convenient knock against Hillary Clinton that she’s cold or impersonal, the classic calculating woman. The favorite dig of Rush Limbaugh and other nags like him is that Hillary reminds men of “their first wife.” (I wonder whom Limbaugh uses as a referent point for the rest of the platoon of his former wives; this is a guy who, on a personal level, can’t make a single person happy, including his drug-addled self.) But if you saw Hillary’s performance on Letterman last night—even realizing that doing a top-10 allows for plenty of advance planning and practice—she was pretty damn good and very endearing. Let Karl Rove and Co. continue to convince themselves that she’s some sort of fatally flawed candidate. That would be a fatal flaw on their part, not hers. --Tom Schaller

EATING (AND GROWING) LOCAL.

EATING (AND GROWING) LOCAL. I've got a piece up today over at In These Times on the rise of community urban agriculture programs. Agriculture and community gardens have a long history in urban areas, but a new generation of urban agriculture programs is focused on using agriculture to address food access and urban blight, and in the process, offering an new approach to food politics. Erika Allen , of Chicago's Growing Power put it this way: "We’re using food to make social connections. It’s not just about growing food -- it’s about practices and how people form relationships, get comfortable with each other and learn to communicate through really owning the food system.” In 1996 a coalition of food advocacy groups lobbied to put funding for urban agriculture programs in the farm bill, and while the version passed the House in July increased that funding, it was also changed from mandatory to discretionary. It remains to be seen what will happen to the bill in the Senate. --Phoebe...

DNC DOLLAR DROUGHT....

DNC DOLLAR DROUGHT. As I wrote recently for Salon , Hillary Clinton is building a campaign organization so large and complete that, if she’'s the nominee, she could tell Howard Dean and the DNC to go screw themselves. She won’'t need a name, a list, a dollar, or a volunteer hour from them. After the Denver convention is over, she can fly solo. We rarely if ever hear criticism of Dean, whose “50 state strategy” has become a Teflon deflector shield against any possible criticism. (For the record, and to prevent the predictable pouncing of critics, in my book I advocate for the 50 state strategy.) For example, a month ago MyDD'’s Jonathan Singer reported fundraising totals for the national party committees. Though congressional Democrats are expected to out-raise their minority Republican counterparts, (as the Republican National Committee has the White House and the Democratic National Committee doesn'’t) party control hardly explains the glaring disparities.

MICHAEL MOORE: NOW APPEARING IN A LEDE NEAR YOU.

MICHAEL MOORE: NOW APPEARING IN A LEDE NEAR YOU. Forget the box office, Michael Moore and Sicko have unquestionably conquered one battle -- becoming shorthand for “American health care crisis” for news writers everywhere. Take a look around: in the Kansas City Star , columnist Rhonda Chriss Lokeman cites Moore’s film to tell the story of Kansan Julia Slaven ’s battle with cancer, over in the St. Petersburg Times , Robyn Blumner uses Moore to question what we’ve lost in the Bush era, and today in TAP Online , Helaine Olen employs one of Moore’s health crisis victims to discuss health credit cards. Even the New York Times is in on the game -- this Sunday’s editorial on WHO country health care rankings invoked Moore in the second graph. In a July Talk of the Town piece New Yorker writer Atul Gawande helped explain the attraction: The documentary filmmaker Michael Moore has more than a few insufferable traits. He is manipulative, smug, and self-righteous. He has no interest in complexity...

The Gentleman From Illinois

"So if you are at all, a little bit excited about Senator Obama," called out the campaign staffer on stage warming up the crowd and tossing out "Obama '08" stocking caps, "Let me hear you now!" The people that gathered in downtown Springfield, Illinois, around 8 a.m. last Saturday were a mixed bag of long-time supporters and inquisitive newcomers, all braving the bitter cold to hear the junior senator from Illinois kick off his presidential campaign. Barack Obama's announcement makes him the ninth candidate to enter the race for the 2008 Democratic nomination. The choice of the Illinois state capitol -- home of Abraham Lincoln and the early proving ground of Obama's political career -- had the calculated allure of accessibility, local politics, and historical gravity. The Trout Lily Cafe, one block south of the old Capitol building where Obama spoke, was one of the many businesses that opened their doors at 7 a.m. to serve the early crowds. The two women working that morning were...

Pages