Phoebe Connelly

Phoebe Connelly is a former web editor of the Prospect. Previously, she was managing editor of In These Times. She writes on political culture, human rights and feminism.

Recent Articles

The Little Picture: Sen. Byron Dorgan.

100106_littlepicture.jpg

Sen. Byron Dorgan also announced today that he would be retiring from the Senate. Read our 2008 look at his crusade against contracting fraud in Iraq.

(Flickr/Boman Library)

The Decade in Liberalism: The People.

Ted KennedyEveryone knows that policies are nothing without a strong public champion. Here are the figures we've watched shape the political landscape of the aughts:

Nancy Pelosi: The San Francisco liberal who took control of the House.

Al Gore: His post-Clinton reinvention.

The Decade in Liberalism: What Makes Us Liberals (and Them Conservatives).

Obama and Clinton.Sometimes the hardest part of politics is articulating exactly why you've picked the position you have. Here are our attempts to pin down what makes us liberals, and them, conservatives:

We've toyed with the idea that liberals should walk away from an interest-group approach to politics.

And dismissed liberal hawks' positioning of incompetence as the problem with the Iraq War.

The Decade in Liberalism: Defining the Agenda.

Roe v. Wade.

The Prospect began 20 years ago with a mission to rethink ideas about public policy and thereby restore plausibility and persuasiveness to American Liberalism. Then it was a quarterly out of Princeton, New Jersey, now, it's a monthly with a lively Web site.

Over the past decade, we've made a point of publishing the articles that reorient the way you think about the liberal agenda.

Here are 10 of our best (and most prescient) suggestions:

The Year In: Economy.

GeithnerAs the "Great Recession" dragged on, the unemployment rate climbed. Here are the top five articles explaining how we got into this situation and how we can get out of it:

Through the debate over the bailouts, it seemed that every financial institution was "too big to fail." But when it comes to banking, size isn't the only thing that matters.

Pages