Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, as well as a distinguished senior fellow of the think tank Demos. He was a longtime columnist for Business Week and continues to write columns in The Boston Globe. He is the author of Obama's Challenge and other books.

Recent Articles

Post-er Boy Bezos

AP Photo/Richard Drew
AP Photo/stf/bd M ost liberals I’ve spoken with are appalled that Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos is buying The Washington Post . I’m no great fan of Bezos or of Amazon’s user-friendly though predatory retailing tactics, but here is a contrarian view of the Post purchase. A widely-shared concern is that one of the last family-owned newspapers with a sense of civic mission is being bought as a trophy property by a billionaire. But wealthy moguls have always been the owners of newspapers. Occasionally, we get lucky with a family that happens to care about the public wellbeing, such as the Sulzbergers at The New York Times , the Grahams at the Post , or the Bancroft family at The Wall Street Journal in the pre-Rupert Murdoch days. But for every one of those, there is a Murdoch or a Hearst. Alas, The Washington Post is no longer your father’s Post . It’s been a long downward slide since the glory days of Kay Graham, Ben Bradlee, Woodward, and Bernstein. The current publisher, Katharine...

The Long Road to a Decent Economy

AP Images/Carolyn Kaster
To underscore a weeklong initiative by President Obama on behalf of rebuilding the middle class, the latest figures on GDP growth, released Thursday, and on job growth, made public Friday, show just how far from a healthy middle class economy we are. Revised figures show that GDP growth fell to a rate of just 1.4 percent in the first six months of 2013, even less than last year’s dismal rate of 2.2 percent. These numbers are not enough to create an adequate supply of jobs, much less good jobs, much less wage growth. And sure enough, when the employment numbers for July were released on Friday, the grim trend was confirmed. Just 162,000 jobs were added in July, and most of them were relatively low-wage jobs. Average earnings actually fell. At this rate it will take another six years to get unemployment back to pre-2008 levels according to the Economic Policy Institute, and more than a decade according to the Hamilton Project. The official unemployment rate dropped slightly, from 7.6 to...

Eternal Summers

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite N ow that President Obama has made it clear in a meeting with the House Democratic Caucus that he is standing by his man, what comes next in the Larry Summers/Janet Yellen/Federal Reserve psychodrama? Will Obama damn the torpedoes and pick Summers to chair the Fed? Will he conclude that Summers has too much baggage and give the job to Yellen—or go with a third candidate? What’s clear now is that Obama himself would like to appoint Summers. The lobbying for Summers by the group of Robert Rubin protégés around the president has been internalized by Obama himself. But Obama insists that he still hasn’t made up his mind. In the end, the president’s decision will boil down to two questions. Can Summers be confirmed? And even if he can win confirmation after a hard-fought vote, would the process unearth such messy information that the White House would conclude that it’s best not to try? The letter by 19 Senate Democrats supporting Janet Yellen is probably the...

Must Austerity Keep Winning?

T he EU’s extreme version of budget cutting has pushed the European economy ever deeper into its worst recession since World War II. The United States, pursuing a bipartisan target of $4 trillion in budget cuts over a decade, is mired in an economy of slow growth and inadequate job creation. Our government’s failure to give debt relief to indentured college students and underwater homeowners functions as a multitrillion-dollar twin drag on a feeble recovery. The smart money knows just how weak this economy is. Federal Reserve Chair Ben Bernanke had only to suggest that he might nudge interest rates up a bit, and markets panicked. So austerity is the wrong medicine for the prolonged aftermath of a financial collapse. Case closed. But hold on. Winning the intellectual debate doesn’t matter, because we keep losing the politics. Until we start changing the policies, or at least begin causing more political embarrassment for the budget hawks, austerity will reign, no matter how perverse...

Brave Words, Awaiting a Stronger Program

AP Photo/Susan Walsh P resident Barack Obama gave a fine speech at Knox College, the scene of one of his most effective pre-presidential moments—a 2005 commencement address he gave as an Illinois senator. Now we need to see whether he follows up with a clear and comprehensive program and brave politics to match. On the plus side, he did not shrink from calling out the Republicans for their sheer negativity and their embrace of trickle down economics. If you ask some of these Republicans about their economic agenda, or how they’d strengthen the middle class, they’ll shift the topic to “out-of-control” government spending—despite the fact that we have cut the deficit by nearly half as a share of the economy since I took office. Or they’ll talk about government assistance for the poor, despite the fact that they’ve already cut early education for vulnerable kids and insurance for people who’ve lost their jobs through no fault of their own. Or they’ll bring up Obamacare, despite the fact...

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