Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, and professor at Brandeis University's Heller School. His latest book is Can Democracy Survive Global Capitalism? In addition to writing for the Prospect, he writes for The Huffington Post, The Boston Globe, and the New York Review of Books. 

Follow Bob at his site, robertkuttner.com, and on Twitter. 

Recent Articles

A Glimpse at the Uniter in Chief

The immigration debate is, among other things, a window on the kind of President George W. Bush might have been if he hadn't been captured by the far right -- a uniter, not a divider, as someone said. Bush, in seeking to satisfy internationalists as well as exclusionists, to respect immigrants as hard-working human beings, and also to deliver good policy, is doing something he has not done since the early response to 9-11. He is committing an act of leadership. Bush's path was cleared last year by another rare case of bipartisanship, the alliance of Senators John McCain and Edward M. Kennedy. Working with immigration groups such as the National Immigration Forum and the National Council for La Raza, McCain and Kennedy embraced what the experts called ''comprehensive immigration reform." That meant not just securing America's borders, but the equally daunting challenge of enabling most of the estimated 12 million people here illegally to regularize their status. People here illegally...

Truth in Capitalism

The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism by John C. Bogle ( Yale University Press, 260 pages, $25.00 ) The stock market collapse of 2000-2001 was the most serious since the crash of 1929. But unlike the earlier Great Crash, the recent one led neither to a general depression nor to a wider indictment of laissez-faire capitalism. Given the continuing commitment of both political parties to largely deregulated financial markets, Congress responded with the most modest of reforms, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act -- and that only thanks to the grotesque self-immolation of Enron. Today, many of the abuses that led to the stock meltdown are reappearing. Insiders continue to reap fortunes at the expense of small investors. Conflicts of interest pervade financial markets. One way to view the crash of 2000-2001 is as a failure of what social scientists call the principal-agent relationship. In this case, the principals are shareholders, and the agents include accountants, lawyers, stockbrokers,...

Dangerous Liaison

Shame on Hillary Rodham Clinton. Rupert Murdoch, the right-wing publishing mogul, is hosting a fund-raiser in July for her Senate reelection campaign. Her explanation is that Murdoch, based in New York, is an important constituent: ''I'm very gratified that he thinks I'm doing a good job." Murdoch runs Fox television, home of Bill O'Reilly and company. No far-right media enterprise has been more relentlessly dishonest in its efforts to destroy American liberalism in general and the Clintons in particular. Fox was prime cheerleader for the bogus Whitewater investigation and the impeachment campaign against Bill Clinton. Fox exists to oppose every liberal principle that Senator Clinton is accused, perhaps falsely, of standing for. Murdoch also publishes the tawdry, viciously anti-Clinton New York Post and the more sober ideological print organ the Weekly Standard . You can't imagine the opposite kind of deal happening in American politics, because a left-wing Murdoch doesn't exist. That...

'We Shall Overcome'

New Orleans -- “This is our first gig," said Bruce Springsteen. ''I hope it goes OK." With that, The Boss and his 18-piece Seeger Sessions Band opened their set with a rocking rendition of ''Oh, Mary, Don't You Weep." As an act of solidarity with this doubly ravaged city, Springsteen began his homage to Pete Seeger tour here, at ground zero of everything ruinous about the people who now run our country. The 37th annual Jazz and Heritage Festival was playing to a smaller, whiter crowd than usual in half-abandoned New Orleans. It would be hard to imagine a more poignant or uplifting marriage of musician, impulse, venue, and moment. Lately, musicians as diverse as Neil Young, Pearl Jam, Green Day, Paul Simon, and Ani di Franco have followed the same impulse. This is surely the time and the place. Commentators solemnly billed Hurricane Katrina as the flood that laid bare awkward truths of class and race in America. It did -- for a vivid week, and then we turned away. By a fine accident of...

Gas Ache

America needs an Apollo-scale program to shift to renewable energy and more efficient vehicles. Politicians of both parties, particularly Republicans, are scrambling to deal with the voter pain of $3-a-gallon gasoline. President Bush wants a $100 tax rebate to help consumers pay for more costly fuel and more tax credits for people who buy (mostly Japanese-made) hybrid cars. He has revived the recurring Republican idea of drilling in Alaska's wilderness. He proposes to suspend federal purchases for the national petroleum reserve. ''Every little bit helps," Bush said, rather pitifully. Next, he'll be wearing Jimmy Carter's sweaters. Democrats' ideas include the proposal by Senator Robert Menendez of New Jersey to suspend temporarily the (industrial world's lowest) federal gas tax of 18.4 cents a gallon to be offset by an excess-profits tax on oil companies, a federal investigation of price gouging, and demands that Bush ''jawbone" his chums at the oil companies and in Saudi Arabia and...

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