Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, a professor at Brandeis University's Heller School, and a distinguished senior fellow of the think tank Demos. He was a longtime columnist for Business Week and continues to write columns in The Boston Globe. He is the author of Obama's Challenge and other books.

Recent Articles

The Republican Con Game

W ith the economy softening and corporate scandals continuing to unfold, November's elections should spell good news for the opposition party. But Democrats are making only marginal headway. One reason is that Republicans have gotten so good at stealing the atmospherics of Democratic themes (though rarely the substance). Master Republican strategist Karl Rove, the chief White House political adviser, has encouraged GOP candidates to blur partisan differences, especially where Democrats have the more popular position. Also, a lot of the issues are fairly complex. So if a Republican candidate insists that she, too, favors a crackdown on corporate crooks, or legislation to safeguard pensions, or a prescription drug program, few voters have the attention span to pursue the details. Republicans are also running away from positions they've espoused in the past, such as privatization of Social Security (which no longer looks like a political winner in a falling stock market). For example, in...

Retirement at Risk

M arking the first anniversary of the September 11 attacks, America finds itself in an interwar funk. We go about our business as in peacetime, even as we seem to be drifting, inexorably, toward a new and more perilous Mideast conflict. While a few foreign-policy barons are in fierce debate, most Americans would rather not think about it. The mood is not exactly escapist so much as avoidant. Describing New York in the fateful summer of 1941 (in The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay ), the novelist Michael Chabon wrote: "The rest of the world was busy feeding itself, country by country, to the furnace, but while the city's newspapers and newsreels at the Trans-Lux were filled with ill portents, defeats, atrocities, and alarms, the general mentality of the New Yorker was not one of siege, panic, or grim resignation to fate, but rather the toe-wiggling, tea-sipping contentment of a woman curled on a sofa, reading in front of a fire with cold rain rattling against the windows. ä Joe...

Phone Home

O ur long-distance telephone service stopped functioning last week. For The American Prospect , it was a pretty big inconvenience. For several hours, we pooled cellphones. My first call was to our bookkeeper. Were we current on our bills? We were. My second call was to Qwest, the offending long-distance company. Its lines were jammed. A company spokeswoman said she didn't know how many customers had lost service, but Qwest's own filing with the Federal Communications Commission, as required by law, indicated that 500,000 calls per hour didn't get through. The gullible public has been trained to live with the fact that Internet providers can go down for a time, but telephone service? Expect more of this. Thanks to deregulation, long distance is becoming less like an essential service and more like just another commodity. The problem is that telephone service is not an ordinary consumer product. It is a public utility. It is also what economists used to call a natural monopoly. In the...

Comment: Democracy and Dread

M arking the first anniversary of the September 11 attacks, America finds itself in an interwar funk. We go about our business as in peacetime, even as we seem to be drifting, inexorably, toward a new and more perilous Mideast conflict. While a few foreign-policy barons are in fierce debate, most Americans would rather not think about it. The mood is not exactly escapist so much as avoidant. Describing New York in the fateful summer of 1941 (in The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay ), the novelist Michael Chabon wrote: "The rest of the world was busy feeding itself, country by country, to the furnace, but while the city's newspapers and newsreels at the Trans-Lux were filled with ill portents, defeats, atrocities, and alarms, the general mentality of the New Yorker was not one of siege, panic, or grim resignation to fate, but rather the toe-wiggling, tea-sipping contentment of a woman curled on a sofa, reading in front of a fire with cold rain rattling against the windows. ä Joe...

Cheap Homes? Don't Hold Your Breath

I s housing the next economic bubble? As the stock market has swooned, many investors are moving their assets into something tangible and useful: bigger and costlier homes. And as prices keep rising, many people outside the investor class find they are paying more money to buy less house. The shift by traumatized investors into real estate is hardly surprising. A house has a reassuring physical existence. Even in a depression, people have to live somewhere. You can make more widgets, but nature provides only so much real estate. For all these reasons, a lot of experts say a housing crash is unlikely. Yet housing prices can outstrip incomes for only so long. In the past two years housing prices have been rising more than twice as fast as incomes nationally and more than three times the rate of incomes in hot markets like Greater Boston. At some point prices will level off and even decline. Housing inflation reflects peculiarities of place. Greater Boston has a diversified and healthy...

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