Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, and professor at Brandeis University's Heller School. His latest book is Debtors' Prison: The Politics of Austerity Versus Possibility. He writes columns for The Huffington Post, The Boston Globe and the New York Times international edition. 

Recent Articles

A Morbid Interregnum

The crisis consists precisely in the fact that the old is dying and the new cannot be born. In this interregnum, there arises a great diversity of morbid symptoms. Back in the day, this observation by an obscure Italian radical named Antonio Gramsci was oft-quoted. His words, written in the 1920s from an Italian prison cell, have great resonance again. The Iraq War is obviously both a disaster and a fraud, but what different future for American policy and the Iraqi people might be imagined and brokered politically? President Bush has lost control of his domestic agenda. Republican moderates have revolted, for the second time in two weeks, against Bush's policies of enacting deeper tax cuts for the wealthy while taking billions out of social programs. Deadlock ensues. High Court nominee Samuel Alito's record is daily revealed to be ever further outside the mainstream, and but will Republican moderates recoil when it comes time to vote? The Bush era is dying a well-deserved demise. But...

The Right Fight

Many Democratic strategists contend that a battle to block Samuel Alito's elevation to the Supreme Court is the wrong fight at the wrong time. The Bush presidency is in trouble on so many other fronts: the deceptions that misled the nation into war, the disastrous war itself, the spreading stain of corruption, the bungling of Katrina, the defection of moderate Republicans from the Bush tax and budget program. Given this self-inflicted Republican collapse, why pick a fight that could make Democrats look divisive and obstructionist? Why make Roe v. Wade the fulcrum of American politics? Why not concede Alito's confirmation, and fight on stronger ground? Why invite the charge of abusing Senate procedure with a filibuster? Herewith a dissent. As the full record emerges, it's clear that Alito is a hard-line right-winger, and not just on abortion rights. Roe may loom too large in American politics. But Alito has been dreadful on numerous other issues. The far right is not cheering because...

A Moderate Defection

Republicans in Congress this week suffered an implosion unprecedented in the Bush era, as moderates in both Houses rebelled against a budget measure in which the leadership tried to combine cuts in programs for the working poor with new tax cuts for the rich. The collapse reflected several factors, including President Bush's deepening unpopularity, the Republicans' loss of two close governors' races last Tuesday, the sidelining of Majority Leader Tom DeLay, and worries about the 2006 election. According to the latest Wall Street Journal poll, by a margin of 48 to 37 percent, voters say Democrats should take control of Congress next year. This is the widest margin for either party since the Journal started asking the question in 1996. The collapse this week in Congress occurred on multiple fronts, and revealed multiple fault lines. In the House, more than 20 Republican moderates, long abused by DeLay's hardball tactics, openly rebelled against the proposed budget. They declared that...

A Tax Surprise

After his re-election, President Bush set two top domestic priorities: privatization of Social Security, and “reform” of the tax system. Privatization ran into a wall of opposition once the public grasped that the price would be a big cut in guaranteed retirement checks. On Tuesday, Bush's blue-ribbon commission on tax reform issued its recommendations, and they are hitting with a similar, resounding thud. The right wanted a flat tax, a consumption tax, or a national sales or value-added tax in place of the progressive income tax. Not only did the commission fail to support any of these, but it took on at least one sacred cow -- capping the mortgage interest deduction -- that would raise taxes on the upper middle class. Taxing consumption rather than income is a practical impossibility because of insurmountable fiscal and political problems of Bush's own making. A consumption tax would represent a huge windfall to the wealthiest, the only Americans who save most of their incomes. But...

Bush Just Doesn't Learn

With the indictment of Lewis Libby and possible indictment of Karl Rove, President Bush faces a fateful choice. Bush can adopt a bunker mentality and try to appease his base of social ultra-conservatives and military hawks, who have brought him such grief. Or he can reach out to the broad mainstream of American politics, as he pretended to do when he ran as a “uniter, not a divider” in 2000. Who would have predicted that the Bush machine would implode so spectacularly, on so many fronts simultaneously? It is worth pausing a moment to take stock of it all: The vice president's chief aide is indicted on perjury and obstruction charges that potentially implicate Dick Cheney himself, since Cheney personally told Libby of CIA agent Valerie Plame Wilson's position. Whether or not an indictment of Karl Rove follows, this investigation puts the dubious origins of the war back in the public spotlight, and will inexorably lead to even more damning evidence that the case for taking America to...

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