Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, as well as a distinguished senior fellow of the think tank Demos. He was a longtime columnist for Business Week and continues to write columns in The Boston Globe. He is the author of Obama's Challenge and other books.

Recent Articles

Globalism and Poverty

Just as Watergate became a metaphor for the Nixon era and
Whitewater the right's symbol for Clinton, Enron is the emblem of the Bush
administration's way of life. Enron is to George W. Bush what Teapot Dome was to
Warren G. Harding. Its demise should also signal the collapse of a whole economic
paradigm, in which smart people were traders and those left behind in the
outmoded economy were throwbacks who actually made things.

Here is a checklist of the several icons that collapsed with the fall
of Enron:

Comment: The Enron Economy

Just as Watergate became a metaphor for the Nixon era and
Whitewater the right's symbol for Clinton, Enron is the emblem of the Bush
administration's way of life. Enron is to George W. Bush what Teapot Dome was to
Warren G. Harding. Its demise should also signal the collapse of a whole economic
paradigm, in which smart people were traders and those left behind in the
outmoded economy were throwbacks who actually made things.

Here is a checklist of the several icons that collapsed with the fall
of Enron:

Praise the Planners for Cape's Uniqueness

TRURO

Heading home from a pleasant break on Cape Cod, I have a new appreciation for the joys not just
of sand, sun, and sea, but of public planning.

Travelers to Cape Cod may wonder why it has been spared the relentless strip-malling that has blighted
most of our vacation spots. Or why most of the Cape's magnificent shoreline is available to ordinary
people who come for a day or a week, as well as those fortunate enough to own oceanfront property.

The answer, of course, is far-sighted public planning.

Fund High-Speed Rail, and Lose Airport Gridlock

Two weeks ago, needing to get from Boston to New York for a meeting, I decided to try
Amtrak's new Acela Express. It was on time, at 3 hours and 20 minutes. Even so, the
office-to-office trip took nearly two hours longer than the air shuttle ordinarily does.

Comment: The End of Citizenship?

For all of the carnival aspect of the Seattle protests, something very important has been stimulated by the World Trade Organization (WTO) sessions. For the first time, a coherent opposition program has begun to challenge the dominant consensus about global trade.

For more than a century, the world's ordinary citizens and their elected leaders have struggled to make market systems socially bearable. At the center of this project is elected government based on democratic citizenship. Govern ment has two basic instruments available to tame capitalism: the power to raise revenues for social purposes and the power to regulate. In the advanced countries, these have served to temper, stabilize, and even energize capitalism.

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