Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, and professor at Brandeis University's Heller School. His latest book is Debtors' Prison: The Politics of Austerity Versus Possibility. He writes columns for The Huffington Post, The Boston Globe and the New York Times international edition. 

Recent Articles

Bush's Tipping Point

The great Social Security battle of 2005 could well be remembered as the tipping point that ended George W. Bush's remarkable winning streak. It's now clear that Democrats are not about to provide Bush bipartisan cover for privatization. Even usually reliable Republicans are putting some distance between themselves and the president. Bush and his allies control the legislative calendar, but for once, time is not on Bush's side. Privatization might have won a quick legislative victory had Bush just rammed a bill through Congress on the momentum of his election win. But the longer the privatization proposal twists in the wind, the more the media, wavering Republicans, and ordinary voters become conversant with the details -- and the worse the plan looks. The Democrats had put their post-election grief behind them by late February and recovered some energy, and the prospect of defeating Bush on a signature proposal has been quite a tonic for them. After a slow start, the AFL-CIO, AARP,...

Bush's Tipping Point

The great Social Security battle of 2005 could well be remembered as the tipping point that ended George W. Bush's remarkable winning streak. It's now clear that Democrats are not about to provide Bush bipartisan cover for privatization. Even usually reliable Republicans are putting some distance between themselves and the president. Bush and his allies control the legislative calendar, but for once, time is not on Bush's side. Privatization might have won a quick legislative victory had Bush just rammed a bill through Congress on the momentum of his election win. But the longer the privatization proposal twists in the wind, the more the media, wavering Republicans, and ordinary voters become conversant with the details -- and the worse the plan looks. The Democrats had put their post-election grief behind them by late February and recovered some energy, and the prospect of defeating Bush on a signature proposal has been quite a tonic for them. After a slow start, the AFL-CIO, AARP,...

The Patchwork Monster

At dinner, two sets of parents of college seniors are discussing their dreams for their soon-to-be newly minted graduates. Doctor? Lawyer? Scientist? Entrepreneur? ''I just hope she gets a job with health insurance," says one mom, breaking the spell. ''The insurance cuts off the day they graduate." A dad chimes in: ''COBRA coverage costs over $400 a month." (COBRA is an acronym for a consolidated budget act that allows you to keep your coverage by paying the premium costs out of pocket. It is well named.) In a country with a rational system of health insurance, your coverage would not be subject to the quirks of when you graduated college, where you worked, or whether you had been sick earlier in your life. But the American system is a patchwork mess of coverage, noncoverage, and inadequate coverage, slightly tempered by well-intentioned efforts to fill in the cracks, which only add to the fragmentation and cost. Meanwhile, George W. Bush's budget proposes to cut some $45 billion out...

Save Our Security

AARP has just proposed closing part of the long-term Social Security shortfall by raising the cap on income subject to the Social Security tax from its present ceiling of $90,000 to $140,000. In other circumstances, this might be a good idea. In the present political context, it's just not smart politics. AARP, which is adamantly opposed to privatization, has been convinced by its pollsters that "you can't beat something with nothing." But there's an even truer rule of politics, namely: When your opponent is doing himself in, just get out of the way. George W. Bush's privatization plan is falling of its own weight. This is not the time to complicate things. Moreover, a big part of the opposition campaign has been based on debunking the Bush claim that the system is in crisis. Polls suggest that Bush is not making much headway with the crisis theme. By proposing this large and visible a tax increase, AARP just lends credence to the crisis-mongering. Indeed, according to AARP's...

Being Howard Dean

Howard Dean seems assured of becoming the Democratic party chairman when the Democratic National Committee votes Feb. 12. Is this a good or bad thing for the Democrats? Conservative Democrats think it's a disaster. One Republican operative was quoted, (inevitably) "It's a scream!" But there's a lot more to Dean than that one awful moment in Iowa, and the real story is rich and complicated. Dean surprised Washington insiders showing that he had a great deal of early support among state party chairs. These people are not diehard lefties or fools. They want to win. Dean, true to his reputation as an organizer, relentlessly worked the phones and ended up impressing many party leaders who hadn't really known him but who share his perspective that the party must be rebuilt on the kind of grass-roots energy Dean showed while his presidential star was rising. Also, Dean really didn't have serious competition. Two kinds of people typically become Democratic Party chairs -- tactical operatives...

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