Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, a professor at Brandeis University's Heller School, and a distinguished senior fellow of the think tank Demos. He was a longtime columnist for Business Week and continues to write columns in The Boston Globe. He is the author of Obama's Challenge and other books.

Recent Articles

Comment: No Ordinary Time

A ll of us find ourselves shocked to be living, abruptly, in a wholly new era--and none were more shocked than the Bush administration. Globally, the White House is now pursuing a feverish multilateralism, a reversal of the Powell Doctrine to avoid "shooting wars" that we can't easily win, and even may soon embrace yesterday's conservative epithet "nation building." Domestically, the holy free market stands impeached, and even Republicans are necessarily looking to government for everything from civil defense to public health to economic stimulus. As a partisan, Bush seems more like Clinton, governing in coalition with the opposition party and outraging his own troops. Yet one hesitates to look for silver linings. There is good reason to worry that we are in for a prolonged siege in which America could sacrifice many of its easy liberties and still not feel secure. We may fail to comprehend why so many ordinary Arabs and Muslims sympathize with bin Laden's goals and resentments if not...

Comment: Senatorial Courtesy

T he nomination of defeated Missouri Senator John Ashcroft as attorney general will test whether Democrats will spend the next four years getting rolled. This is George W. Bush's signature appointment, his thank-you gift to the far right. How bad is Ashcroft? This bad: He was one of three senators to sponsor the Human Life Amendment, which says life begins at fertilization. This would ban not just abortions but birth control pills. National Journal ranked him as tied for most conservative senator, to the right of North Carolina's Jesse Helms. The League of Conservation Voters gives him a zero. He disdains separation of church and state and gets a perfect score from the Christian Coalition. He accepted an honorary degree from racially separatist Bob Jones University. In 1999 Ashcroft blocked the appointment of Missouri Supreme Court Judge Ronnie White to the federal bench. White, who is an African American, had cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee,...

Comment: Politics and Beanbag

P olitics, as Finley Peter Dunne's Mr. Dooley had it, ain't beanbag. But lately the Republicans have been playing political hardball while too many Democrats play beanbag. Candidate George W. Bush managed to have it both ways, casting himself as a uniter but offering raw partisan rhetoric against the Democrats. During the debates, Bush kept faulting Al Gore for failure to accomplish in eight years many of the things Gore was now promising. But the vice president couldn't bring himself to utter the obvious rejoinder--that the culprit was Republican obstructionism--lest he sound partisan. Throughout the Clinton years, the Republicans demonstrated the value of partisanship. In Clinton's first two years, they just blocked everything, making Clinton look ineffective. In 1994 they gained both houses of Congress. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich's Contract with America succeeded in nationalizing party politics and creating something very rare for the United States: a...

Comment: The Business of America

L iberals confront the charge that we are anti-business. Modern liberals like to strike a "third-way" pose of being pro-entrepreneur and pro-market while socially liberal on such issues as tolerance and the environment. Old-time anti-corporate liberals, such as trade unionists and Naderites, are said to be stuck in a 1930s time warp. But every so often, politics offers a graphic reminder of why good liberals are necessarily anti-business. Successful individual entrepreneurs and dynamic corporations are certainly economic assets; the problem is organized business as a political force--how it corrupts our politics, skews priorities, disdains workers, and blocks democracy from carrying out the wishes of ordinary citizens. The issue du jour is war profiteering. Corporate America and its Republican allies have mounted a shameless Treasury raid masquerading as economic stimulus. Their ploy may even backfire politically. But this destructive role of organized business is the rule, not the...

Comment: Party Poopers

N ot long ago, the Democrats were taking comfort from their five-seat gain in the Senate and their 50-50 tie. But the Senate, it's now clear, is far from truly tied. On the John Ashcroft confirmation vote, Republicans held all their troops and eight Democrats defected, four of them northern liberals. On the outrageous vote to scrap new safety standards on ergonomics, six Senate Democrats crossed the aisle. In the House, 16 Democrats joined 207 Republicans. If the Democrats had voted as a bloc, they might have held the line. These defecting Democrats are a series of concentric circles. At the center are two southern nominal Democrats who might as well be Republicans, John Breaux of Louisiana and Zell Miller of Georgia. Radiating out are Democrats from fairly conservative states who face tight re-elections (Max Baucus of Montana, Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas, Mary Landrieu of Louisiana), or Democrats not in re-election trouble but with close ties to business (Fritz Hollings of South...

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