Robert Reich

Robert B. Reich, a co-founder of The American Prospect, is a Professor of Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley. His website can be found here and his blog can be found here.

Recent Articles

...And Does Anyone Know How to Define an 'American' Interest?

The Washington Post Last year I woke up to discover that I'm now working part-time for a German company named Bartelsmann AG. You see, when I wasn't looking, Bartelsmann scooped up Random House, which has published several of my books and still occasionally sends me exceedingly small royalty checks. Bartelsmann is now the largest publisher of English-language books in the world, and for all I know it may become the largest publisher of Chinese books as well. Do I care whether an American-owned publisher (which may print its books in Singapore, bind them in New Zealand and market them through Hong Kong) gains better access to China than my own Bartelsmann? Not at all, as long as the royalty checks keep coming. Don't think me either unpatriotic or selfish. It's just my way of suggesting that there's something missing in all the talk about how America will soon have its goods on Beijing's streets and will own...

No Escape

Broadcast February 2, 2001 Recently I was putting gas in my car, minding my own business, enjoying my solitude there by the gas pump, when the gas pump suddenly comes alive with a commercial -- right there, on a little liquid-crystal screen mounted on the pump. There's nothing I can do about it. I'm in the middle of filling my tank with gas. I'm a captive audience to a loud talking head who s hawking a product at me. The same thing happened the other day when I was in an elevator. The doors shut, the elevator starts to move, I m enjoying a moment of peace and quiet, and then suddenly another little screen up in the corner of the elevator starts up, with another loud commercial. I can't get out of the elevator until I reach my floor. I mean, I could have got off at the next floor and waited for another elevator, but the other one would have had a commercial, too. Have you noticed -- it s happening all over. Little commercial messages on little screens which you can't escape from. You...

A Shareholder, and a Citizen

The New York Times Soon, possibly tonight, a federal judge will rule on the Justice Department's antitrust case against Microsoft. But whatever the decision, it's only the first round in this and related litigation. That's why I've been spending my money lobbying Congress to cut the budget of the Justice Department's antitrust division. I've also hired a fleet of Washington lobbyists to persuade Congress that the government's lawsuit is misguided and launched a "grass roots" Internet campaign to get other people to send messages to their representatives saying the same thing. I've sent money to Republican and Democratic campaign committees, which will use it to benefit candidates sympathetic toward Microsoft. I've even organized lobbying in state capitals to get the message out to state lawmakers. You see, I'm a shareholder of Microsoft. Not a big one, mind you. Bill Gates may not even know that...

No Easy Answers To Easy Credit Fallout

USA Today This week I got three letters from credit companies, all wanting me to sign up. One of them congratulated me on having been "selected" for a credit line of up to $5,000. Another commended me for being one of its most "valued" patrons and offered me a "low introductory" interest rate plus a free cell phone. The third assured me that my "financial needs would be taken care of." It also promised me extra frequent-flier miles if I signed up now. I was flattered by all of the attention. Then I did some research. Last year, credit card companies sent out almost 4 billion solicitations - the equivalent of 16 letters to every man, woman and child in the United States. If you could breathe, you probably received one. If you could write your name, you got 12. I even found a dog that got one. Credit card issuers aren't overly worried about whether the people they're soliciting are good credit risks. People...

Coping With the Shortage of High Tech Workers

Computer World The biggest threat to America's booming IT sector is a severe shortage of skilled people. Some estimates put the current shortfall at 400,000. What's to be done? In most industries facing such shortages, salary levels rise until enough people are attracted to fill the need. Supply responds to demand. But, as you'll see in Computerworld's 13th Annual Salary Survey ("Return to Sanity,"), salaries in the corporate IT sector have been rising no faster than in most other parts of the economy. There's no beating the free market: If the IT sector wants more skilled people, it is going to have to pay for them. And salaries don't even tell the whole story. IT jobs are becoming less secure. The half-life of a software engineer is coming to resemble that of a professional athlete. One recent survey shows that six years after getting their computer science degrees, 60% of graduates are...

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