Ross Gelbspan

Ross Gelbspan, a 30-year veteran journalist, is author of The Heat Is On (1998) and Boiling Point (2004), which contains more detail on his ideas for an energy transition. He maintains the Web site www.heatisonline.org.

Recent Articles

Two Paths for the Planet

Will we rewire the world with clean energy -- or descend into political chaos, social disruption, and climate hell? And will Washington get with the program?

Humanity is standing at a crossroads between a more just, peaceful world and an increasingly chaotic, turbulent, and authoritarian future driven by a succession of climate-driven emergencies. We could find ourselves struggling to survive a desolate era of climate hell marked not only by a degraded and fractured society but also by more authoritarian governments.

Global Denial

As floodwaters recede and bodies emerge, Americans are belatedly making some terrible connections about the Bush administration, which has a contempt for public planning matched only by its habit of subordinating reality to public relations. One aspect, of course, is Iraq. The other is the needless tragedy in New Orleans.

The Hurricane Katrina disaster is also a curtain-raiser for the largest-ever challenge to public planning: the consequences of global warming. If the present complacency continues, we will see more flooding, more breakdown of democratic civil order, more loss of human life and dignity, and more vivid divisions between rich and poor.

Global Denial

As floodwaters recede and bodies emerge, Americans are belatedly making some terrible connections about the Bush administration, which has a contempt for public planning matched only by its habit of subordinating reality to public relations. One aspect, of course, is Iraq. The other is the needless tragedy in New Orleans.

The Hurricane Katrina disaster is also a curtain-raiser for the largest-ever challenge to public planning: the consequences of global warming. If the present complacency continues, we will see more flooding, more breakdown of democratic civil order, more loss of human life and dignity, and more vivid divisions between rich and poor.

Beyond Kyoto Lite:

At the end of the hottest October on record,
delegates from 165 countries
met in Marrakech last fall to finalize the Kyoto Protocol on global climate
change. At first glance, the Kyoto goals seem negligible: By 2012, greenhouse
gases must be cut to slightly below 1990 levels--a reduction to be realized
through a loophole-ridden system of emissions trading. And thanks to the Bush
administration, the 165 signatory nations do not include the United States, the
superpower superpolluter that emits a quarter of the world's greenhouse gases.

Bush's Climate Follies

By withdrawing from the Kyoto Protocol--the attempt by 160
nations to forge a treaty that will reduce worldwide emissions from coal
combustion and oil burning, thus averting a global-warming catastrophe--President
George W. Bush trashed years of work by European negotiators just as he was about
to make his European diplomatic debut.

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