Sam Boyd

Sam Boyd is a former assistant web editor at the Prospect

Recent Articles

ELECTION NIGHT GUIDE: INDIANA HOUSE RACES.

Both Baron Hill and Mark Souder have won, indicating that there won't be unexpectedly massive gains or a surprisingly bad night for Democrats. Throughout the evening we will be providing updates on the races, counties, and demographic groups discussed in our election night guide . --Sam Boyd

IF THIS DOESN'T MEAN IT'S OVER, I DON'T KNOW WHAT DOES.

Via Ben Smith , there's already a website dedicated to impeaching Obama . Meanwhile, I'm off to register ImpeachJindal.com a few years early. --Sam Boyd

VOTING IS GOOD BECAUSE YOU GET TO DECIDE ON ISSUES (CRAZY, I KNOW).

It took me a while to figure out why I love, no luuurve, this video. Of course in part it's the catchy song and cute kids [Eds. Note: That's why I passed it around the office.] , but what I really like is that, without taking sides, it is premised on the idea that you should vote because of, y'know, issues. Doesn't sound like much, but it's a huge step up from the usual Rock the Vote "you should vote because it's, like, awesome and ... Democracy... and puppies!" malarkey. --Sam Boyd

OBAMA'S CAMPAIGN COMMERCIAL WATCHED BY 21.7 PERCENT OF HOUSEHOLDS.

Seems to me he got his money 's worth: The combined overall household rating for Senator Barack Obama ’s Wednesday night infomercial, in the top 56 local television markets where Nielsen maintains electronic TV meters, was 21.7. [...] In comparison, the final debate between the two presidential candidates received a 38.3 household rating in the top 56 local TV markets. The candidates’ first debate on September 26 received a 34.7 household rating in the top 55 markets; their second debate, on October 7, received a 42.0 household rating in those markets. [...] One rating point equals 1% of the total TV audience in a given market. --Sam Boyd

A WIDELY CONSIDERED QUESTION I HAVEN'T THOUGHT ABOUT AT ALL.

Then again, I don't haunt the "corridors of Democratic power": And no subject is more avidly considered in the corridors of Democratic power than the future role of his chief adviser, political consultant David Axelrod . Democrats who know the Chicago-based political consultant, the key architect of Obama 's campaign and of his public image, say Axelrod has signaled that he'll seriously consider taking on a job in the administration. That decision would be a central choice in shaping an Obama White House, and determining the relationship between his style of governance and political strategy. Snark aside, it is an interesting question, and I'm surprised I haven't seen it discussed anywhere else. As the article notes, there's a menu of possible jobs, from a formal member of the White House staff ( Karl Rove was Bush's deputy chief of staff) to an independent consultant on retainer. That said, it's not clear how much difference where Axlerod is housed would make: Axelrod would be...

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