Sam Boyd

Sam Boyd is a former assistant web editor at the Prospect

Recent Articles

STEVENS CONVICTED ON ALL SEVEN COUNTS.

Well the Alaska Senate race was almost certainly decided today:

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens has been convicted of lying about free home renovations and other gifts he received from a wealthy oil contractor.

The Senate's longest-serving Republican, Stevens was found guilty on all seven counts of making false statements on Senate financial documents.

The verdict throws the upcoming election into disarray. Stevens is fighting off a challenge from Democrat Mark Begich and must now either drop out or continue campaigning as a convicted felon.

GOP "DEATH LIST" PREDICTS BIG LOSSES FOR REPUBLICANS.

This is pretty impressive:

A document provided to Washington Whispers from a House GOP official shows that they could lose a net 34 seats. That means the Democrats would have a 270-165 advantage in the 111th Congress. In the Senate, Republicans expect to lose also but to keep up to 44 seats, ensuring their ability to stage a filibuster.

MCCAIN SUPPORTERS PROTEST VOTING.

Recently, group of Republicans actually protested an early voting location in North Carolina:

As you can see from these videos, no one held anything back. People were shouting about Obama's acknowledged cocaine use as a young man, abortion and one man used the word "terrorist." They also were complaining that Sundays are for church, not voting.

THE CONSEQUENCES OF A QUICK DECISION ON NOV. 4 DEPEND ON HOW HONEST THE MEDIA IS.

Politico reports today that networks are grappling with the possibility that an Obama victory will become apparent early in the night on Nov. 4th. If, as seems likely, Obama wins Virginia, where the polls close at 7 PM EST, the piece points out it will be fairly clear fairly how the election will shake out (we could have a good idea even earlier if Obama win Indiana where the polls close at 6). The question is how up-front news anchors will be about the implications of such a victory:

DEMS SET FOR MORE BIG GAINS IN THE HOUSE.

You may not have noticed amid the clamor over Democrats' chances of reaching 60 seats in the Senate, but they're also set to make big gains in the house -- perhaps even equaling their 30 seat gain in 2006:

Independent political analysts like Stu Rothenberg and Charlie Cook have upped their predictions of Democratic gains in recent weeks -- with a 20-seat Democratic gain now seen as the floor for November.

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