Sam Boyd

Sam Boyd is a former assistant web editor at the Prospect

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In his new book, The Bottom Billion, Paul Collier pushes development economists to broaden their approach.

THE PUNDITS CAN'T...

THE PUNDITS CAN'T DECIDE WHY THEY DON'T HAVE A CRUSH ON OBAMA. In general, I resist claims about which candidates "the media" does and doesn't like. True, there is a real hostility to John Edwards and there was a time when "the media" really was John McCain's base. Still, viewing coverage only through this lens often obscures more than it reveals. That said, I've been dismayed by just how unfair (and that's really the only word I can use) the media has been in its coverage of the recent Clinton-Obama fight (see my previous post for more on that). Initially many argued that Clinton won the debate:

CLINTON WON THE...

CLINTON WON THE BATTLE, OBAMA IS WINNING THE WAR. Improbably, the Clinton-Obama fight is still going strong and, also improbably, Obama now seems to have the upper hand. How do I know? In the first 24 hours after the debate it was Obama who was arguing Clinton was distorting his position, now it's Clinton's surrogates who are arguing Obama is distorting her statement. As Marc Ambinder pointed out, It's never a good thing in politics to say "what I meant to say was." That's the position Obama was in shortly after the debate:

CAN WE NOT LET THE CLEAVAGE CONVERSATION BEGIN?

CAN WE NOT LET THE CLEAVAGE CONVERSATION BEGIN? The Washington Post today has an article defending it's recent style section piece on Hillary Clinton's neckline: "Let the Cleavage Conversation Begin." How about not? Pretty please? The article is a completely vapid attempt to justify what was itself a completely vapid piece that was rightly derided and condemned by pretty much everyone. The best part is the author of the original piece's defense:

CONSERVATIVES ARE TURNING JAPANESE, I REALLY THINK SO.

CONSERVATIVES ARE TURNING JAPANESE, I REALLY THINK SO. Perhaps because conservatism in the U.S. is collapsing faster than the Tour de France, Republicans have recently consoled themselves with foreign elections. Most recently they spent a good deal of time crowing about the victory of Nicolas Sarkozy in France (better not tell them about his fondness for national-champion industries), and now they're turning their attention to Japan, where the ruling LDP faces a tough election this weekend.

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