Sam Boyd

Sam Boyd is a former assistant web editor at the Prospect

Recent Articles

MORE (BLOGGING ABOUT) SEX!

MORE (BLOGGING ABOUT) SEX! Following up on Dana and Ezra's recent posts, I highly recommend this Slate review of a book on exactly this topic by Mark Regnerus. It turns out that the best way to get evangelical teens to avoid sex is for them to see themselves as an "embattled minority" beset on all sides by wild sex-crazed peers. Alternatively they could be Mormons. The piece is full of other fun details too.

WHEN ANIMALS CONDUCT COVERT OPERATIONS... AND ATTACK.

WHEN ANIMALS CONDUCT COVERT OPERATIONS... AND ATTACK. In one of the weirder stories I've seen recently, Iranian Police have picked up for questioning 14 squirrels that allegedly were carrying spying equipment (via Boing Boing and Danger Room):

The IRNA [Islamic Republic News Agency] said that the squirrels were kitted out by foreign intelligence services - but were captured two weeks ago by police officers.

A Foreign Office source told Sky News: "The story is nuts."

YES HE MAKES...

YES HE MAKES A GOOD TIRAMISU, BUT WHAT ARE HIS VIEWS ON ROE? We know Karl Rove and the Bush administration gave briefings on Republican chances in the 2006 elections to at least 15 agencies, including many that are ostensibly nonpartisan. Clearly this is bad and likely illegal, but beyond that I'm a little confused why this happened at all. What exactly did Rove hope to achieve by politicizing the Peace Corps, for instance? Why did he go to the trouble of briefing the U.S. Counsel to Bermuda about 55 key house races?

SLIGHTLY UNDERHANDED POLITICAL IDEA OF THE DAY.

SLIGHTLY UNDERHANDED POLITICAL IDEA OF THE DAY. The Washington Post reports today that the USDA makes hundreds of millions of dollars a year in farm subsidy payments to dead people. Prospect blogger Dean Baker points out that this is slightly overblown since the actual cost is about 52 cents a year to each American. Nonetheless, the whole affair gives me an idea for an underhanded political trick that could be used by opponents of farm subsidies.

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