Scott Lemieux

Scott Lemieux is an assistant professor of political science at the College of Saint Rose. He contributes to the blogs Lawyers, Guns, and Money and Vox Pop.

Recent Articles

VOTE FRAUD FRAUD UPDATE.

VOTE FRAUD FRAUD UPDATE. New evidence suggests that the failure of U.S. Attorneys to pursue bogus vote fraud changes was an even bigger factor in the DOJ's political purge than was previously known: Nearly half the U.S. attorneys slated for removal by the administration last year were targets of Republican complaints that they were lax on voter fraud, including efforts by presidential adviser Karl Rove to encourage more prosecutions of election- law violations, according to new documents and interviews. Of the 12 U.S. attorneys known to have been dismissed or considered for removal last year, five were identified by Rove or other administration officials as working in districts that were trouble spots for voter fraud -- Kansas City, Mo.; Milwaukee; New Mexico; Nevada; and Washington state. Four of the five prosecutors in those districts were dismissed. It has been clear for months that the administration's eagerness to launch voter-fraud prosecutions played a role in some of the...

COUNTERMOBILIZATION NOTES.

COUNTERMOBILIZATION NOTES. Charles Krauthammer , taking one of the laziest column ideas off the shelf, is the umpteenth nominally pro-choice wealthy male columnist to argue that Roe should be overturned and that this would end most of the conflict about abortion in the United States. The problem with his argument is that there isn't the slightest reason to believe that it's true . Matt deals with some of the obvious problems; a few more points, some in response to his commenters: One of Matt's commenters brings up the often-told myth that Ruth Bader Ginsburg actually agrees with Krauthammer, but this is very misleading. Ginsburg's argument isn't that the Court shouldn't have reached the outcome it did in Roe , but that it should have waited until gender equality jurisprudence was better developed to rest on those grounds. Even this much different argument, however, is also almost certainly wrong; it wouldn't make any difference to the public what grounds the Court used to reach its...

SUPPORTING REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS IS THE NEW CONTRARIANISM.

SUPPORTING REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS IS THE NEW CONTRARIANISM. Christine Stansell 's new article about Carhart II is very good. The puzzle it presents is how on earth it made it into the New Republic -- perhaps Jeffrey Rosen and Ben Wittes were away on a cruise (high contrarianism on the high seas!) or something. Anyway, it's a good analysis of the problems with the decision: Kennedy's opinion undermines constitutional protections for a woman's right to make decisions established in Roe v. Wade. And, just as disturbingly, it summons up assumptions about women that go back to discredited paternalistic decisions of the Supreme Court. "It's only a couple of paragraphs in the decision," notes Yale Law School Professor Reva Siegel. "But it's alarming." In Kennedy's words, one hears the echo of the anti-choice movement's new emphasis on abortion as a de facto violation of something at the very core of women's being. Medical technicalities take up the bulk of the Court's majority opinion, but the...

"A SOLUTION IN SEARCH OF A PROBLEM."

"A SOLUTION IN SEARCH OF A PROBLEM." A terrific article by Garrett Epps puts Karl Rove 's pressuring of U.S. Attorneys to pursue bogus "vote fraud" cases into the larger (and highly consequential) context of the GOP's vote fraud fraud . Epps also draws our attention to the Supreme Court's endorsement of the GOP's myths in a little-noticed opinion from 2006: We can't count on the U.S. Constitution to protect the election process. The Constitution does not explicitly protect the right to vote, and the conservative majority on the Rehnquist and Roberts courts has proved friendly to anti-turnout measures. As Mark Graber of the University of Maryland pointed out recently, the court echoed right-wing rhetoric about voter fraud in a little-noticed 2006 opinion allowing Arizona to implement its restrictive voter-ID law. "Voters who fear their legitimate votes will be outweighed by fraudulent ones will feel disenfranchised," the court's per curiam opinion stated. This is the argument that...

THE SELF-IMMOLATION OF RUDY.

THE SELF-IMMOLATION OF RUDY. As a staunch Giuliani opponent, I must admit a certain grudging admiration for his decision to be explicitly pro-choice rather than adopting the High Contrarian "I'm pro-choice, but it should be left to the states (and, er, whatever regulations Congress can pass" position, and it's refreshing in a way that primary voters would see this as the kind of dodge it almost always is . It's good for the country for a serious Republican candidate to take the normatively correct and (funding questions aside) majority position on the issue. Matt seems right , however, that " John McCain and Mitt Romney should, in my opinion, be popping some champagne this morning." The strategic calculation seems to be that the front-loaded primary will include more liberal states in which his abortion position won't be a big issue. The problem is that I don't see much evidence that Republican primary voters in those states are particularly socially liberal. Schwarzenegger had to win...

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