Tim Fernholz

Tim Fernholz is a former staff writer for the Prospect. His work has been published by Newsweek, The New Republic, The Nation, The Guardian, and The Daily Beast. He is also a Research Fellow at the New America Foundation.

Recent Articles

THE STRATEGIC CHALLENGE OF AFHGANISTAN.

There's a growing cottage industry of skepticism about recommitting military and development resources to Afghanistan, as both Presidential contenders plan to do. The Taliban has reconstituted itself relatively effectively from its base in Western Pakistan, and as this article points out, presents a serious problem -- the linkages between Afghan Taliban, Pakistani Taliban and Pakistan's Directorate of Inter-Services Intelligence are deepening, all while Al Qaeda makes a haven in the same area.

POWER UP, GO NEGATIVE!

Various Dems and observers have been getting nervous of late that Obama hasn't been fighting back hard enough against the various attacks from the McCain campaign. Presumably, this straightforwardly negative ad, coming as part of Obama's energy policy roll-out, will be greeted with a sigh of relief:

TELL ME, O MUSE, OF THAT INGENIOUS HERO.

The Washington Post summons forth a huge psychopolitical profile of John McCain today, which manages to simultaneously trot out nearly every cliche about the man, from adviser Mark Salter to hero Robert Jordan, while actually challenging him on the issues. One small insight: Salter is quoted saying that "things go on inside McCain's head that rarely or never come out." Uh, if these are examples of what comes out, then no one should know what stays in.

THE GREAT GAME.

The Great Game was what they used to call geopolitical intrigue in the Hindu Kush, and once again it returns to the news. Reports confirm that Pakistan's military intelligence agency, the Directorate of Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), was involved in bombing the Indian Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, killing 54.

HOUSING BILL UPSIDE.

For all his analytical failings, David Broder is a great reporter. Today's column highlights one of the best parts of the recent housing bill, a trust fund to develop more low-income housing by siphoning money from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Sheila Crowley, an affordable housing advocate, notes that this is the first expansion of affordable housing Congress has passed since 1990 and the first targeting low-income people since 1974.

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