Tim Fernholz

Tim Fernholz is a former staff writer for the Prospect. His work has been published by Newsweek, The New Republic, The Nation, The Guardian, and The Daily Beast. He is also a Research Fellow at the New America Foundation.

Recent Articles

MCCAIN ON FOREIGN POLICY: VAGUEING IT UP.

There are not a lot of surprises in the Foreign Policy panel, since McCain considers it his strength and talks about it frequently. Indeed, Faiz Shakir quoted from Matt Yglesias' excellent cover story on McCain's foreign policy when introducing the panel.

One recurring theme of this entire event is that McCain has not explained the actual details of his proposals. And even on foreign policy, which is meant to be his best issue, he hasn't answered basic questions such as what conditions would have to be like on the ground in Iraq before he would be comfortable withdrawing troops.

--Tim Fernholz

SICK-END WARS.

Peter Harbage introduces the discussion of McCain's healthcare proposals by pointing out that the Senator's goal is cost containment, not universal healthcare. Two nuggets:

MCCAIN ON TAXES -- DON'T LISTEN TO ALL THAT SENSIBLE STUFF I SAID IN 2001 AND 2003.

Here at McCain University (a Wonk Room production) the message is clear: A McCain presidency would be a third term for the Bush administration. Our first panel is on economic policy, with Robert Gordon moderating a discusion between Gene Sperling and Jared Bernstein. Some notes:

OBAMA'S PERSONAL HOUSING CRISIS.

Well, it's not quite a crisis, but this piece chronicling the Senator's support for failing affordable housing that is publicly funded and privately managed is certainly problematic for the Senator's campaign. It brings to the fore, once again, his connection to jailed developer Antonin Rezko, it sullies his former-community organizer/good government image and it raises problematic questions among his base of liberals and particulary African-Americans—is he, like Bill Clinton, a candidate whose liberal campaign will be replaced by business-focused governing?

BIPARTISAN CONFUSION.

The big debate this week, certainly in presidential campaign press releases and conference calls, centers around which candidate is more bipartisan. Both candidates claim it's them. Pundits, inevitably, have their own opinions.

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