Vox Pop

The Prospect's politics blog

Ted Cruz Is Not Well-Liked

He doesn't like you, either. (Flickr/Gage Skidmore)
"Be liked and you will never want," said Willy Loman, the protagonist of Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman . "That's the wonder, the wonder of this country, that a man can end with diamonds here on the basis of being liked!" Of course, the great tragic figure of the American theater was terribly wrong about that. But in politics, personal relationships still matter, even if the days when Lyndon Johnson would call up a senator and sweet-talk him into changing his vote on a bill are long gone. I'm thinking about this because Ted Cruz—Tea Party hero, up-and-comer, future presidential candidate—is suddenly finding himself on the receiving end of a whole lot of hostility from House Republicans. By way of context, there's a broad consensus that Cruz is, as George W. Bush would put it , a major-league asshole. He's not someone who wastes time and energy being nice to people or cultivating relationships that could be useful down the road. He's pretty sure he's smarter than everyone, and...

The Last of the Late-Term Abortion Providers

After Tiller A t one point early in After Tiller , a new documentary on third-trimester abortion, a counselor at a late-term abortion clinic asks a patient to explain why she wants to terminate her pregnancy just a few months before she gives birth. “My baby’s got a disease, and it’s fatal in a lot of ways,” the woman explains between sobs. The camera zooms in on her hands, clenched around a ball of tissue. “He could be stillborn. He would have a very short life, full of surgeries and seizures until he would pass. He’s not a viable child. The most loving thing I can do is let him go now.” Stories like this echo throughout After Tiller , directed by Martha Shane and Lana Wilson, which opens today in New York City. The film follows the lives and work of the only four doctors in the country who perform abortions in the last trimester of pregnancy. Three of the doctors portrayed in the film—Stacey Sella, Susan Robinson, and LeRoy Carhart—worked for George Tiller, the late-term abortion...

Daily Meme: Cruzing for a Bruising

Ted Cruz has had quite a week. First, Speaker John Boehner announced yesterday that the House would sneak a Obamacare defunding resolution into their upcoming budget bill up for a vote on Friday... a bill that would be certain to fail in the Senate. Amid much WTF-ing from some of his fellow Senate Republicans, there was much rejoicing from Mr. Cruz . If his favorite pet project ends up shutting down the government, well, it's not the end of the world, folks. But wait. It seems Cruz may have changed his mind about the feasibility of his grand scheming. Today, he basically said the House bill was a non-starter because Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has the votes to strip the anti-Obamacare gobledegook from the Senate version of the budget bill. Which, unsurprisingly, made conservatives very, very upset. Cruz quickly tried to recover by saying that he'd pull a Rand Paul and filibuster if the Obamacare Entropy Act doesn't sail through the Senate. But the damage is already done. One can...

It's Not about the Video Games

No, these are not mass murderers in training. (Flickr/Abraxas3d)
The pattern has become familiar: There's a mass shooting, and while some liberals try to raise the issue of the fact that our society is drowning in guns, more "realistic" commentators quickly turn the discussion away to some of different questions. Did the mental health system fail? And what about those violent video games? Aren't they a big part of the problem? That's what people are asking now about Aaron Alexis. The answer is simple: No, video games aren't part of the problem of gun violence in America. Or more specifically, even if they're part of the problem, they're such an infinitesimally small part of the problem that blaming them for the endless gun slaughter in America is like blaming one of the leaves on the tree that fell on your house for all the damage to the roof. This shouldn't be difficult to wrap your head around. Think about it this way. Could an early intervention by mental health workers and authorities have helped Aaron Alexis before he turned murderous? Perhaps...

Secular Corporations Cannot Exercise Religion, My Friend

AP Photo/Matty Zimmerman
Earlier this week, the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals rejected claims stating the requirement that corporations performing secular functions—in this case, the manufacturing company Autocam—cover contraception as part of their employee-insurance packages represented a violation of these corporations' rights. The 6th Circuit is the second circuit court to reject these claims, following the 3rd Circuit (conversely, the 10th Circuit held that there was a "likelihood" that the Hobby Lobby chain of craft scores was " substan tially burdened" by the requirement.) Perhaps even more interesting is the reasoning the 6th Circuit panel used to reach its decision. According to the court's persuasive argument, it is not possible for a for-profit corporation with secular purposes to "exercise" religion in a way protected by the Constitution or federal statues. To provide the relevant background, the most obvious source for a claim that the contraceptive coverage requirements violate religious freedom...

My Shutdown Lament

Truly this is a place of darkness. (Flickr/K.P.Tripathi)
I have a problem. My job is to keep up with the world of politics and then write commentary, explanations, and analysis that readers will find interesting, entertaining, or informative. Sometimes that involves big-picture looks at policy issues, sometimes it involves making pretty pictures ( look here —I made maps!), but much of the time, it's about giving some kind of novel perspective on the things that are happening today, this week, or this month. I try very hard to always add something, to not just repeat what everybody else is saying but to offer something different, so that people who read this blog will come away feeling they understand the world just a little bit better. Perhaps I don't always succeed, and you may or may not get value out of any particular thing I've written. But what do you do when the news turns into some kind of hellish version of Groundhog Day , repeating the same abysmal scenario over and over, in which even the happy ending doesn't involve finding true...

The Conservative Plan for Medicaid Expansion

AP Photo/Osamu Honda
AP Photo/The Columbus Dispatch, Chris Russell A number of policymakers on both sides of the aisle cheered when, in April, the Arkansas Legislature passed a law both expanding Medicaid and transforming it into a service available in a marketplace of insurance options, a move known as the “private option.” Similar cheers erupted in June when Iowa Governor Terry Branstad approved a similar measure. The legislation marked a major accomplishment—not because the policies are necessarily improvements over traditional Medicaid but because they establish politically palatable paths for conservatives who want to increase access to health care. In Pennsylvania, GOP Governor Tom Corbett—who was against Medicaid expansion and this week announced he is is tepidly for it—has pointed to the these new plans as a model he might consider (among other, more controversial changes.) The private option may be a way to make comprehensive health-care coverage viable in other Republican states—but that depends...

The Fed Stays the Course

AP Photo/Susan Walsh
F inancial markets rallied when the Federal Reserve defied the rumor-mongers and resolved to continue its program of keeping interest rates very low until the unemployment rate improves. There was only one dissenting vote on the Fed’s policy-setting open market committee. What’s going on here? Ever since the run-up to the collapse of 2008, what’s good for Wall Street hasn’t exactly been good for the rest of the economy. Are these ultra-low interest rates just pumping up more financial bubbles, as critics fear? Or does a still weak economy need this form of stimulus? Think of it this way. There are risks to continuing a policy of very easy money, but premature tightening would be even worse. The markets and the pundits got this one wrong because the hawks in the Fed system had been leaking rumors that they had the votes and that the Fed would soon be “tapering” (pulling back) its program of $85 billion-a-month in bond purchases. Chairman Ben Bernanke, to appease the hawks, lent...

The Obamacare Is Falling! The Obamacare Is Falling!

AP Photo/Charles Dharapak
AP Photo/Steve Browne, Valley City Times-Record As we approach the full implementation of the Affordable Care Act at the end of the year, confusion still reigns. Most Americans don't understand what the ACA does or how it works, which is perhaps understandable. It is, after all, an exceedingly complex law, and from even before it passed there was an aggressive and well-funded campaign of misinformation meant to confuse and deceive Americans about it, a campaign that continues to this day and shows no sign of abating. To undo uncertainty and banish befuddlement, we offer answers to a few questions you might have about Obamacare. What's happening when? The next important date is October 1, when open enrollment for insurance plans on the new exchanges begins. Those who sign up will begin their new insurance on January 1, when the rest of the high-profile components of the law take effect. The individual mandate, requiring everyone to carry insurance or pay a fine, takes effect, as does...

Daily Meme: What Recovery?

Yesterday, the Census Bureau released the latest data on our nation's poorest residents. The news wasn't reassuring. The U.S. poverty rate remained unchanged last year, stubbornly stuck at 15 percent . Twenty-two percent of Americans under age 18 were living in poverty in 2012. The gap between rich and poor households didn't budge in any statistically significant way either. As for the gender wage gap, that stopped closing a decade ago . Men working full-time, year-round are making less now than they did in 1973 . Families are making less than they did in 1989. Median incomes have gone down 8.3 percent since 2007. State and local results will be released later in the week, but it's already clear that the West is faring the post-recession period the best. Recent research shows that poverty's effects on a life reach further than we thought. "The effect of being poor and having to manage a hard financial problem is equivalent to the loss of 13 IQ points —comparable not only to the loss...

Shutdown Report: How to Play Chicken and Lose

AP Images/J. Scott Applewhite
AP Images/J. Scott Applewhite R epublicans are likely to incur serious political damage in their effort to hold hostage continued funding of the government in exchange for deep spending cuts. This routine has become an annual ritual, and in the past President Barack Obama has been the first one to cave. The 2011 Budget Control Act, which includes the automatic sequester, is one bitter fruit of the president’s past failure to hang tough in the face of Republican extremist demands. But this time is different. The Tea Party Republicans, who dominate the GOP House Caucus, are demanding that President Obama de-fund the Affordable Care Act in exchange for their willingness to fund ordinary government spending in the new fiscal year, which begins October 1. But they picked the wrong demand. In the past, Obama was willing to make deep cuts in federal spending in order to get a budget deal with Republicans. The Affordable Care Act, however, is a nonnegotiable for the president. It’s his...

We Shall Overwhelm

AP Images/J. Scott Applewhite
AP Images/J. Scott Applewhite F our years ago, the modern Tea Party seemed to emerge from nowhere, leaving journalists bewildered and the public with few reference points to understand seemingly spontaneous rallies by middle-class people seeking lower tax rates. A search for the phrase “tea party” in connection with “politics” in major newspapers yielded fewer than 100 mentions in 2008—and when the words did appear linked together, they suggested studied formality and decorum. The next year, they appeared more than 1,500 times, often connected to “protest demonstration.” But little was spontaneous about the new party. “Social movements that explicitly defend the interests of the rich and the almost-rich have been a recurring feature of American politics,” Isaac William Martin, a sociologist at the University of California, San Diego, reminds us in his new book, Rich People’s Movements: Grassroots Campaigns to Untax the One Percent . “Such movements shook the American polity before the...

Time to Give America a Raise

AP Photo/Louie Balukoff
I t’s been a good week for the nation’s numerous poverty-wage workers. They’ve been way overdue for a good week. On Tuesday, the Labor Department issued a much anticipated and delayed extension of the federal minimum wage and overtime regulations to the nation’s 2 million homecare workers. Last Thursday, the California legislature passed (and Governor Jerry Brown pledged to sign) a bill that raised the mega-state’s minimum wage from $8-an-hour to $10. Taken together, these two measures limiting poverty-wage work underscore a host of significant changes to the political economy. The Labor Department’s extension of the minimum wage recognizes the growth of homecare as an industry increasingly like any other, with agencies big and small, many relying on partial government subsidies, employing millions of workers. It also signals the continuing extension of federal work standards beyond those that originally covered white men disproportionately. When the Fair Labor Standards Act (which...

A Long Way from the End of Men

AP Photo/Mark Lennihan
AP Photo/Patrick Semansky T hough we’ve technically been recovering from the Great Recession since late 2009, the poverty rate in the United States has been stuck at about 15 percent since 2010. New data released yesterday from the Census Bureau showed that last year wasn’t much better. Poverty rates held steady at the highest levels in a generation. Median incomes have fallen in the last ten years by more than 11 percent. Coupled with recent studies showing that most of the recovery’s gains have gone to the top 1 percent of income earners, the data on poverty confirms what many already knew: Inequality is growing, and the middle class is dying. That’s especially true when you examine the status of women and racial minorities. The median incomes for Asian and white families last year were $68,636 and $57,009 respectively. For Hispanics and blacks, they were $39,005 and $33,321. These incomes are statistically unchanged from 2011, which means that if the economy is growing, the average...

Could Conservatives Help Obamacare Implementation Work?

She only wants to help, really. (Flickr/American Life League)
Supporters of the Affordable Care Act, up to and including President Obama, have been at pains to point out to anyone who'd listen that as with any large and complex piece of legislation, implementation is going to be imperfect. There are going to be hiccups. Hurdles. Stumbles. Stops and starts, ups and downs, potholes and roadblocks and detours. They've been saying it because it's true, because they want to prepare the media and the public, and because they know that conservatives will be squawking loudly every time it becomes apparent that some feature of the law needs to be adjusted, trying to convince everyone that even the most minor of difficulties is proof the law should never have been enacted in the first place. But let me make a counter-intuitive suggestion: Perhaps all the inevitable overblown carping from the right will prove to be a good thing, making the law work better in the long run. Not because the conservatives' motives aren't bad (they are), and separate from the...

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