Vox Pop

The Prospect's politics blog

Daily Meme: Can Climate Week Change the Weather?

The congressional calendar this week is full of environment-centered hearings and events, so climate-change activists have seized upon the moment, named it "Climate Week," and planned a week of protests. This week also marks the five-year anniversary of Keystone XL's first application submission. Action isn't centered around Capitol Hill alone—activists have been staging protests all over the country , especially along the pipeline's intended path . 350.org has planned 150 protests for Saturday alone. It looks like the White House's decision over the pipeline could stretch into next year —although the southern end of Keystone should likely be in full gear soon—which is absolutely perfect, if you ask the lobbyists who make a killing on the issue for both sides. A delay also gives more time for the anti-Keystone forces, who've begun to focus on the slim economic advantages of the controversial oil transporter. On the pro-pipeline sidelines, some—including one North Dakota senator —think...

American Public Oddly Reasonable on Syrian War

President Obama addressing the nation on Syria.
When public opinion is running against the position you've taken on something, it's natural to conclude either that the people just haven't yet heard your argument clearly, or even that opinion doesn't matter. And in one sense, it doesn't. If you're right, you're right, even if most Americans disagree. Not long ago, most Americans had a problem with people of different races to get married; they were wrong about that even if they were in the majority. Of course, that's a matter of substance, which is distinct from matters of politics, which can constrain your behavior whether you're substantively in the right or not. So I wonder what Barack Obama thinks of public opinion on Syria these days. I doubt that he's like George W. Bush, who was forever certain that "history" would judge the Iraq War to be a smashing success. By now Obama may have concluded that he'll probably never win the public over on this question, so he should just try to move things along as best he can. There's a new...

Step Aside, I'm a Doctor

AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli Assemblywoman Toni Atkins, a Democrat from San Diego, urges lawmakers to approve a bill allowing nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and physician's assistants to perform early-term abortions. I t’s hard to miss the fallout from the barrage of abortion restrictions that came out of state legislatures this year. Four abortion clinics in rural Texas announced plans to close after determining it would be too expensive to comply with a new state law imposing unnecessary medical standards. A clinic in Ohio , where similar laws have been passed, say they may also have to close. Iowa’s telemedicine abortion program —a creative workaround designed to bring first-trimester abortion to women in rural parts of the state—was recently shut down by the state medical board. In states nationwide, the hurdles to access safe, high-quality abortion care are getting higher and higher. But California is bucking the trend. A law that would allow advanced-practice...

The Carnage Continues

Just another of the dozens of mass shooting sites in America. (Flickr/NCinDC)
Here are some names that have been in the news in the last year; see if you can remember any of them: Andrew Engeldinger. Kurt Myers. Dennis Clark. John Zawahri. Pedro Vargas. Ring any bells? In another country, each of these men would be nationally famous. But not here; they were in the news for a couple of days, and then quickly forgotten. Each of them committed a mass shooting in 2013. We have so many mass shootings— over 50 in the last two decades alone—we don't even bother to recall the perpetrators' names. And guess what: yesterday's horrific shooting at the Navy Yard in Washington will be forgotten pretty quickly, too. In this morning's New York Times , the Navy Yard shooting merited a one-column headline, along with "U.N. Implicates Syria in Using Chemical Arms" and "Push for Yellen To Lead at Fed Gathers Steam." My guess is that for most national news outlets, this will be a three-day story: yesterday was the first day ("This is happening"), today is the second day ("This...

Homeowners vs. Big Bad Banks

AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File
AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File I n June, six former employees of Bank of America's loan-modification department testified in court that since 2009, they had been instructed to lie to struggling homeowners, hide their financial documents, and push them into foreclosure. In the most egregious example, the employees said they were offered Target gift cards as a bonus for more foreclosures, which generated lucrative fees for the bank. The employees, who were in charge of implementing the government’s Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) at the bank, described the same deceptive practices across the country. Two weeks ago, U.S. District Court Judge Rya Zobel dismissed the case , denying class-action certification to 43 homeowners in 26 states who suffered because of similar conduct. “Plaintiffs have plausibly alleged that Bank of America utterly failed to administer its HAMP modifications in a timely and efficient way,” Zobel agreed, adding that vulnerable homeowners had to wade...

The Sum of Its Parts

Flickr/Will O'Neill
We're just two weeks away from the start of open enrollment for the new state health care exchanges established as part of the Affordable Care Act, and it's safe to say that Republicans will not be able to repeal the law between now and then. It's equally safe to say that they won't be able to repeal it by January 1, which is when the people who sign up for insurance through those exchanges start on their new plans. That's also the date when a whole bunch of other components of the law take effect. When that day comes, will Republicans have to abandon all hope of ever repealing it? The ones who don't understand the law (and let's be honest, that's probably most of them) might answer yes. Once it goes into effect and begins destroying lives, sapping us of our precious bodily fluids, and generally turning America into a socialist hellhole where all hope has died and the flickering flame of freedom has been snuffed out, people will quickly realize what a disaster it is and support repeal...

Daily Meme: Bye, Bye Larry

Yesterday, former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers withdrew his nomination for the Federal Reserve chairmanship. The wave of Janet Yellen-speculation following in the announcement's wake was swift. Summers's reasoning? "This is a complex moment in our national life. I have reluctantly concluded than any possible confirmation process for me would be acrimonious and would not serve the interests of the Federal Reserve, the Administration, or ultimately, the interests of the nation’s ongoing economic recovery." Makes sense, especially given the hardening opposition to the controversial economist in town from pundits and politicians alike. The Monkey Cage posits that the last time an executive nomination played out like this was nearly a century ago. So, back to Janet Yellen. Ezra Klein has five reasons she should have the job, starting with the fact she's way qualified. The American Enterprise Institute seems skeptical that Republicans would dare filibuster the first female fed nominee...

Reagan's Court v. the Libertarians'

I n 1983, Chief Justice Warren Burger asked Congress to create a new national appeals court to resolve cases the Supreme Court was too busy to hear. At the Reagan White House, a cheeky 28-year-old Harvard Law graduate named John G. Roberts was horrified. “The President we serve has long campaigned against government bureaucracy and the excessive role of the federal courts,” Roberts wrote to White House Counsel Fred Fielding. Burger’s proposal would create “an additional bureaucratic structure to permit the federal courts to do more than they already do.” Anyway, Roberts continued, the Supreme Court already made too many decisions. “There are practical limits on the capacity of the Justices, and those limits are a significant check preventing the Court from usurping even more of the prerogatives of the other branches. The generally-accepted notion that the Court can only hear roughly 150 cases each term gives the same sense of reassurance as the adjournment of the Court in July, when...

Proof the Left Coast Is the Best Coast?

AP Images/Reed Saxon
The AFL-CIO held its national convention in California last week, and it turns out it couldn’t have picked a better time to be there. For it was last week that California really began to deliver on the promise of the labor-Latino alliance. On Thursday, with the legislature rushing to meet its targeted adjournment date on Friday, it passed a bill raising the state’s hourly minimum wage from $8 to $10—the highest in the nation. It passed a bill permitting undocumented immigrants to get driver's licenses. Governor Jerry Brown has committed to sign both bills. It also passed a bill mandating overtime pay for domestic workers, and, for good measure, outlawed the sale of rifles with detachable magazines and required owners of such rifles to register them with the state. And perhaps just as remarkably, on Thursday, 15 Republican members of the state legislature announced their support for federal immigration reform, including legalization of the undocumented. None of these victories were...

Anti-Choicers' New Mexico Experiment

The American Prospect/Chloe Hall; AP Photo
AP Photo/ The Albuquerque Journal, Kitty Clark Fritz; homepage photo by Chloe Hall/The American Prospect Abortion-rights supporters and opponents demonstrate at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. I n early August, several dozen teenagers and a few adult supervisors descended on the Holocaust and Intolerance Museum in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with a request: They wanted the curators to add an exhibit on abortion. When their demand was rebuffed, the teens—who were spending the week in the city as part of a pro-life training camp sponsored by Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust—unfurled a banner outside the building calling Albuquerque “America’s Auschwitz.” The protest catapulted Albuquerque into the national media, but the demonstration is just part of a larger experiment by the recent wave of pro-life activists flocking in from out of state: Can they transform New Mexico—a moderate state with liberal abortion laws—into another reproductive-rights battleground? After a number...

America's Exception Deception

AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster I n a democracy, politicians seldom counsel the public to be modest. They flatter and praise the voters, telling them that they are just and wise, hardworking and principled, possessed of boundless vision and common sense. And here in America at least, they also generalize those virtues from the people to the nation itself. America, Americans are endlessly reassured, is unique and special among the world's countries. It i sn't just that we're the most important country, which is undeniable, since we have the biggest economy, the biggest (and most frequently deployed) military, and the most influential popular culture. Those things could change someday. Instead, what voters are told over and over again is that we're "exceptional." We're not just stronger or richer; we're better. Indeed, we're stronger and richer because we're better. And we may well be exceptional in how often we're told that we're exceptional. My knowledge of the electoral politics of other...

Did Summers Spoil It for Yellen?

AP Images/Mark Lennihan
AP Images/Mark Lennihan Now that Larry Summers is out of contention for chairman of the Federal Reserve, the nomination of Janet Yellen should be assured. Unfortunately, Yellen still is far from a safe bet. Her qualifications, certainly, are not in doubt. Yellen is currently vice chair of the Fed and before that she was president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. She has had a distinguished academic career, which she interrupted to serve as chair of President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers, and after that, as a governor of the Federal Reserve. Yellen is better positioned than any other woman to break the glass ceiling that has kept the Fed from having any female chair throughout its century-long history. Yellen, who began her scholarly career as a labor economist, has also been outspoken about the need for the Fed to continue its policy of economic stimulus to help strengthen the faltering economic recovery. Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz, who preceded her as chair...

Daily Meme: Elections, Elections Everywhere

New York City voters have chosen their candidates for November's general election, and prognosticators, professional and recreational, have already bathed the papers, airwaves, and web with their thoughts about who will win. Elections around the country are also starting to ramp up as fall rushes near—let's check in and see how the biggest (or most entertaining) races stand. Terry McAuliffe has a slight lead in the Virginia gubernatorial race against Republican Ken Cuccinelli, and 19 percent of voters are still undecided. And The Washington Post is all like, who cares who's ahead, this whole election is gross . Next door in Maryland, they have to wait another year before choosing a new governor. But you don't have to wait to sift through a slideshow of potential candidates! Speaking of 2014 lists, here's one of the less conventional recruits gunning for a seat in Congress. Senator Rand Paul is campaigning for New Jersey senate candidate Steve Lonegan today. Too bad Cory Booker is...

No One Has to Tweet

I really doubt Paul Krugman would do this.
I can recall, back in around 2008 or so, sitting in an airport listening to a radio story about this thing called Twitter, in which some tech booster was explaining how great it was to be able to send out little 140-character updates on what he was doing all the time, so the the people he cared about could have a sense of his daily life. I thought it sounded both inane and horrifying, but like most things governed by network effects , its value not just increased but changed in nature as more and more people got on it. I resisted going on Twitter for a long time (despite the pleading of my then-editor), in part because I was worried it would just be a distraction from my work. But it turned out, once I got on, that it became invaluable to my work. Most of the people I follow are writers or other people who point me to things I might need to know or want to write about; when I'm lost for something to say, Twitter will often send me on a path that will ultimately lead to a post or a...

Could You Live on $11,940 a Year?

A couple of months ago, Fox News host Neil Cavuto went on a rant against fast-food workers striking for higher wages, explaining that when he was but a wee pup of 16, he went to work at an Arthur Treacher's restaurant for a mere $2 an hour, setting him on the road to becoming the vigorous and well-remunerated cheerleader for capitalism he is today. For all his economic acumen, Cavuto seemed to forget that there's a thing called "inflation," and the two bucks he earned in 1974 would today be worth $9.47. That's less than the striking fast-food workers are asking for (they want $15 an hour), but significantly more than the $7.25 today's minimum-wage workers make. Not to mention the fact that so many of them are not teenagers but adults trying to survive and support families. (According to the Economic Policy Institute, 88 percent of those who would benefit from an increase in the minimum wage are over the age of 20; that and much more data on the topic can be found here .) Yesterday,...

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