Culture

Breaking Bad's Endgame

The finale is destined to underwhelm not just because of unreasonable expectations but because the show’s integrity won’t let it do otherwise.

Why "Duck Dynasty" Became the Latest Conservative Cultural Touchstone

Right-wing political figures fall all over themselves to sing the praises of the wacky Robertson clan, the reality TV stars of the moment.

The Conversation: What’s the Best Way to Die?

A doctor and a journalist wrestle with our health-care system’s troubled relationship with death.

The Strategy that Dare Not Speak Its Name

A new book from Ken Pollack unpacks the potential ways the United States could move forward with Iran, and why containment may be the least bad option we have.

Watching Blue Caprice in the City that Serves as Its Stage

The movie based on the 2002 D.C. sniper spree is an odd watch in the wake of this week’s Navy Yard shooting.

The Last of the Late-Term Abortion Providers

A new documentary, After Tiller, follows the only four doctors in the country who will terminate a pregnancy in its last three months.

Rise of the “Nones”

America’s rapidly changing religious landscape

We Shall Overwhelm

A new book explores when and why America’s rich protest. 

The Known Known of "The Unknown Known"? Rumsfeld Has No Regrets

Errol Morris's documentary of the ever-chuckling, never remorseful former Defense secretary is a spellbinder.

Middle-Aged White Males: No Longer the Ones Who Knock

As we bid Breaking Bad adieu, a few words about the antiheroes who reigned over the past decade—and are finally going gently into the good night.

A Twerk Too Far

Somewhere in America Miley Cyrus is appropriating black culture, but she's certainly not the only artist—we've got a long and tangled history of it. 

Rummy Returns

And it's like he never left.

Nikki Giovanni Remembers 1963 with a New Poem

New work from a legendary writer in honor of the March on Washington's 50th anniversary, and a conversation on growing up during the civil-rights movement

"Blue Jasmine" Another Black Mark

Woody Allen's new movie is the latest evidence of how superficial he is—and how his humor and New York sensibility have lured critics and filmgoers into overlooking his shallowness.

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