The Magazine

  • Vol. 26 No. 4
    Fall 2015


    • The European Prospect

      Robert Kuttner

      With all the pathologies of the 1930s resurgent, Europe's experiment in economic and social union has never been more at risk. 
    • Frustration Is Driving Both Parties' Voters Toward Radical Make-Believe

      Paul Starr

      Frustration is driving voters on both sides of the partisan divide toward radical make-believe


    • 55-45 Politics in a 50-50 Country

      Thomas Schaller

      Republicans start every election cycle with structural advantages regardless of the issues and all the other factors that usually determine who wins elections.
    • Employer Political Coercion: A Growing Threat

      Alexander Hertel-Fernandez

      Since Citizens United, companies can legally require workers to participate in politics—and fire them if they refuse.


    • A Caricature of Black Reality

      Randall Kennedy

      Ta-Nehisi Coates has written the race book of the year. Too bad it’s disempowering.
    • It's Still a Struggle

      Samuel Issacharoff

      The fight for voting rights hasn’t been the straightforward battle we once might have expected to win and be done with.  
    • Security for a Precarious Workforce

      David Bensman

      What will it take, economically and politically, to broadly regularize employment?  
    • A Government Both More Secretive and More Open

      Mary Graham

      The same decades that saw the growth of national-security secrecy saw the rise of the public’s “right to know.”  
    • The Shame of Tax Havens

      Reuven Avi-Yonah

      Taxes evaded in offshore havens could fund a lot of public services.  


    • Our Incoherent China Policy

      Clyde Prestowitz

      The proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership is bad economics, and even worse as containment of China.
    • Bronx Cheer

      Harold Meyerson

      The New York borough that once symbolized urban decline is safer and more stable—but most Bronxites’ lives are still precarious.
    • Eight Principles for Reforming Solitary Confinement

      Margo Schlanger & Amy Fettig

      How we can reduce, make more humane, and ultimately eliminate a practice that, in Justice Kennedy’s words, drives prisoners “to the edge of madness” 
    • Hedge Funds: The Ultimate Absentee Landlords

      Peter Dreier & Aditi Sen

      How Wall Street capitalized on the foreclosure crisis to become the nation's largest owner of single-family homes. 
    • Bring Back Antitrust

      David Dayen

      Despite low inflation and some bargain prices, economic concentration and novel abuses of market power are pervasive in today’s economy—harming consumers, workers, and innovators. We need a new antitrust for a new predatory era.
    • Still We Rise

      Darrick Hamilton, et al

      The continuing case for America’s historically black colleges and universities.
    • The New Public Option

      Justin Miller

      Despite hostile courts, can our campaign-finance system be reformed from the bottom up?
    • Unfriendly Fire

      Suzanne Gordon

      Despite ideological attacks and under-funding, the Veterans Health Administration is a model public system.
    • Pushing Civic Tech Beyond Its Comfort Zone

      Rachel M. Cohen

      By all means, let’s use technology to improve government services. But the real promise is greater political accountability.
    • The Unsavory Side of Airbnb

      Steven Hill

      How the popular matching company facilitates landlord conversion of entire rental buildings to de facto hotels.

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