Dana Goldstein

Dana Goldstein, a former associate editor and writer at the Prospect, comes from a family of public school educators. She received the Spencer Fellowship in Education Journalism, a Schwarz Fellowship at the New America Foundation, and a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellowship at the Nation Institute. Her journalism is regularly featured in SlateThe AtlanticThe NationThe Daily Beast, and other publications, and she is a staff writer at the Marshall Project. 

Recent Articles

IMMIGRATION AND HEALTH REFORM -- STILL A PROBLEM.

In an interview with our dearly departed Ezra , White House health policy czar Nancy-Ann DeParle confirms what I've been reporting -- that abortion is one of "six to 10" issues stalemating the Senate Finance Committee "Gang of Six." (For more on the background of that debate, check out my fresh-off-the-presses feature report .) But DeParle also mentions another combustible social issue -- immigration. You're probably saying, but wait! I thought none of the health bills extend coverage to undocumented immigrants! That's true, but because President Obama has said comprehensive immigration reform -- including a path to legalization -- is on his agenda for later this year, anti-immigrant legislators are agitating about the eventual inclusion of today's illegals in tomorrow's health care system. They'd like to "contain costs" by writing a provision into health reform barring future legalized residents, at least for a period of time, from accessing government subsidized health care, as all...

Aborting Health Reform

Without reproductive-health coverage, any public insurance plan is doomed to fail.

In September 1993, as Hillary Clinton lobbied Congress to pass her health-reform bill, she plainly addressed the looming controversy over reproductive care. "It will include pregnancy-related services, and that will include abortion, as insurance policies currently do," she told the Senate Finance Committee. Conservatives were incensed. But as the history books record, it was industry pressure and legislative malaise that killed Hillarycare, not debate over women's rights. On the campaign trail, Barack Obama did not shy away from the issue of abortion, pledging, "On this fundamental issue, I will not yield." In the context of health reform, though, the president and his staff have been reluctant to directly address reproductive rights. In a March interview with the Christian Broadcasting Network's David Brody, the White House's chief domestic policy adviser, Melody Barnes -- who once sat on the board of Planned Parenthood -- claimed she had never spoken to the president about whether...

WHO'S WHO IN HEALTH REFORM? AND DOES IT MEAN LIBERALS WILL LOSE?

A blockbuster A1 story from the New York Times this morning, by David Kirkpatrick , gives progressives more heartburn on health care reform. Rahm says: "We have heard from both chambers that the House sees a public plan as essential for the final product, and the Senate believes it cannot pass it as constructed and a co-op is what they can do. We are cognizant of that fact." More each day, it sounds as if the White House is willing to give the Finance Committee a free pass on the public option and other progressive goals, such as extending insurance subsidies to those with incomes up to 400 percent of the poverty level -- $88,200 for a family of four. Kirkpatrick reports: Industry lobbyists and moderate Democrats in both chambers, though, argue that the White House’s actions behind the scenes show a recognition that the finance panel’s anticipated compromise is the most likely template for any final legislation. Why do Finance and its health industry-funded chairman, Max...

WOMEN, MARRIAGE, AND NAME-CHANGING.

A new study finds that 70 percent of Americans agree, either strongly or somewhat, that it is beneficial for women to take their husband's last name when they marry. And shockingly, about half of the 815 respondents to the survey said the government should force married women to change their names. USA Today reports : Respondents who said that women should change their names tended to view it as important for establishing a marital and family identity, she says, while those who thought women should keep their own names focused on the importance of a woman establishing a professional or individual identity. [Sociologist Laura] Hamilton says that about half of respondents went so far as to say that the government should mandate women to change their names when they marry, a finding she called "really interesting," considering typical attitudes towards government intervention. "Americans tend to be very cautious when it comes to state intervention in family life," she says. My parents...

UNDERSTANDING BURMA.

My friend Nicole McClelland has written an upcoming book on war and human rights in Burma. So if you're looking for someone to explain the arrest of human rights activist Aung San Suu Kyi , for meeting with an American Mormon who arrived at her home uninvited, Nicole's your gal : Here's what the Western powers would like to happen, as summed up by British Foreign Office Minister Ivan Lewis: "We want to see Burma's neighbors, the ASEAN [Association of Southeast Asian Nations] countries such as China, Japan, and Thailand, applying maximum pressure on this Burmese regime." Here's what's never going to happen: that. Burma's home to some of the largest natural-gas reserves on the planet. In 2008, it experienced a 250 percent increase in the number of Chinese companies involved in mining, oil and gas, and hydropower development over the year before; trade between the two countries is up to $2.6 billion, from $630 million in 2001. Japan (along with China and Russia) rejected a proposal to...

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